Conversation Society, News and Sport
Helper icon  Helpers: Chris2mates PrincessFruitBat

About us

Midsummer's Eve is a free online dating community - based around friendship, real meetups, real people, and real relationships. We've been online since 1999 and have twice won Radio 2's Web Site of the Day award. So why not join us for free and join in the discussion?

How are you coping with

these price hikes for food, fuel, electricity and gas?

Samx
Samx Male
A month ago
Having seen the signs awhile ago, I have taken precautionary measures. I bought tins, pasta, rice and other condiments, storing them in my little flat. I use my electric buggy, rather than the car to get around. I have deliberately chosen my flat to be near the town centre, for precisely that reason. Have you taken any measures?
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
A month ago
Yeah I've been preparing for winter for months. Dry stores.. alternative cooking methods to using the oven.. buying heaters in the sale.. growing what food I can, some success some not..making preserves, freezing veg,  this weather will have a negative impact of farming for winter produce I'm sure of that.
FBF_Peace
FBF_Peace Male
A month ago
That would have been the norm for everyone in the good old days!
wonderoushen
wonderoushen Female
A month ago
Personally I'm more concerned with keeping cool, than warm, I know I'm lucky and am somewhat sheltered from the price hikes.


I dont' have the room to store loads of food stuff and we're still having supply problems in the shops here, its not unusual to go to the shops and see half the shelves empty, to not be able to get basics like bread flour. Everybody buys stuff when its there because it might be another month before you see it again.

I tend to live quite frugally anyway, I don't have heating on in the bedroom, as I can't stand sleeping in a hot or even warm room, it has to be sub zero for me to put a think duvet on the bed, I shower rather than have a bath and batch cook and freeze. I could cut out a few things, but then they're things I buy to keep me healthy and active for the most part, so theres a limit to how much I could cut out.
StillGotIt
StillGotIt Male
A month ago
Pre-purchasing food can be false economy. I commented to someone else that the price of some staples are actually coming back down again. With supply and demand if a lot of people pre-purchase there will be a temporary price increase before it reduces again. I just mentioned my honey on 'nextdoor' in the context of a different thread and I've already sold out at premium price with people on back-order. (The girls are under strict instructions HaHaHa.) With more pm's keeping coming. I had intended for it to be too high at this point to put people off in order to cope with supply thinking that I could share with friends and family and appears that I could have charged more right now. As a person on 'No Nonsense Beekeeping' said on fb "And the lesson you learned? Quality isn't cheap. You are offering a bespoke local product. You are the provenance." One asked for six with a view to purchasing more. At this rate I don't know whether I'll be able to keep up because it's flying off the shelves. Supermarkets will base the pricing structure accordingly.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
A month ago
With 38% of working age households relying on benefits - it seems likely that many will go in to debt in an effort to get through the winter.

A lot of that group will be in Rentals and we could see rising Rent arrears if households choose to prioritise Bills over Rents.

That is an issue across both Social/Private Rentals - as almost half of households directly capped by OBC are in Social Rentals.

Many households will simply be unable to service their heating bills without drastically lowering fuel consumption - so lifestyles will need to revert to pre 1970s when most homes were not kitted out with central heating.
StillGotIt
StillGotIt Male
A month ago
I already live frugally so there's little I can cut back on. I'm glad I took the plunge and had solar panels installed because it's offsetting the hit to a certain degree but I don't think that I could turn the heating down any further because I had cut back already. I'm not rushing out to buy extras at this point because there's usually a price spike when people panic purchase before the price drops back. The same spike happened at the beginning of lock-down before settling back down as the supply chain sorted itself out. People act like headless chickens. There were queues a mile long at supermarkets at the time and I just breezed through the market opposite to it without having to queue up. I would imagine that supermarkets will be more prepared this time around for human psychology.

As I see it there's little we can do about it at the moment because we know the markets are static and all we can do is ride the storm. Never trouble trouble until trouble troubles you, it only doubles trouble and troubles others too.
Laura1961
Laura1961 Female
A month ago
I realised yesterday that my 40 sachet box of Asda's own cat food is now £10 ! It used to be £8.25 - that's over a 20% increase in a few months

Now my maths is not brilliant but it's not bad, so by my thoughts that's twice the rate of inflation ? if the rate of inflation is 8.25 ( I did just google that )

My dog food was £14 in November, £15 in December and £16.50 in January and this ' cost of living crisis ' had not really begun then.

The loaf of white bread I buy is £1.25 instead of £1.10, and I am sure a 2 pint of milk has gone up too.

But like millions of others, my pay increase from my employer has not got up by 8.25% nor 20% !

Now I regard myself as one of the lucky ones, as I work 13 hours a week and am in receipt of my private pension, so right now I am better off than I was 2 years ago when I worked 18 hours a week and my pension was not through yet. So if I wanted I could increase my hours back up to 18.

But not everyone is able to increase their income if needed / wanted.

I think come winter there will be a lot more wearing of proper warm clothing - jumpers/jerseys whatever you like to call them, extra blanket on the bed etc. instead of turning up the central heating.
G-O-W
G-O-W Female
A month ago
'I would imagine that supermarkets will be more prepared this time around for human psychology.'

You'd like to think so, wouldn't you!
StillGotIt
StillGotIt Male
A month ago
I've found that a lot of essential products have dropped back around here. Tesco bread had gone up to 60p, it's now come right back down to 36p and quite a few essential produce that seems to have done the same.
G-O-W
G-O-W Female
A month ago
I think it may be a bit different only an hour from London tob. 
StillGotIt
StillGotIt Male
A month ago
Aldi Waffles went up to £1.36 now £1.09, Bread has now dropped by to 36p. I've found that my weekly shop has dropped back overall compared to a peak a few months back. There's a guy on nextdoor near us that is running a £1 per week subscription service for cheaper than costco pricing with free delivery for essentials which I think is a good deal. Even if you don't need a weekly shop it's probably cheaper overall especially when you consider it's delivered. The calculated risk is based on what he can get in.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
A month ago
I found that during the pandemic our pet supplies increased in cost. Asda also seems more expensive lately. We used to have their own branded cat food but the cats stopped eating it, and some of the Sainsburys own brand was pulled of the shelves a while back as it was toxic. So we made a switch to a safer bet and they now eat Felix and Iams... Bloody expensive.  I purchased a waffle iron a while back for 20 quid, you can cook them fresh in 3 minutes, make a batch and then freeze them... Saves money... And they taste nicer..
AndyMacG
AndyMacG Male
A month ago
Well Samx, if your flat is so little as you say then i assume theres not much you could really stock up on thats gonna save you much, TBH i’m still shopping every week and my weekly bill isn’t changing that much and as for saving energy on cooking there are things like tray bakes that means putting everything in to one pan so you only use say the oven to cook with and the microwave will help to save on energy costs.

So Samx, you have deliberately chosen your flat to be near the town centre perhaps you can tell us mere mortals how that is possible or are you just talking your thoughts, again?





Andy Mac
StillGotIt
StillGotIt Male
A month ago
Oh glory for us mere mortals living in old farm houses far from the madding crowd where we can reap natures harvest down country lanes and eagerly await apricot laden trees in the orchard, pick wild mushrooms on the fields and honey from the hives ;-)
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
A month ago
My flat isn't massive but I have a fair few cupboards to store food in the kitchen.. it all depends upon the layouts and things..there's more cupboards in my kitchen than in my old 3 bed house, and that kitchen was huge! 
 I fill the cupboards up and then stock rotate, checking sell by dates etc.. making sure there's at least 3 of each thing in stock.. passata, chopped tomatoes etc do the once a month big cook and fill the freezer then rotate that monthly too in autumn and winter.. 
StillGotIt
StillGotIt Male
A month ago
On a less frivolous note I don't see any particular rush because Asda announced a price drop-and-lock on many major products for the rest of the year and is launching a new range of Just-Essentials. They announced that its price cuts would include fresh fruit and vegetables, fresh meat, rice and noodles. The other supermarkets will have to come in line to compete rather than ignore and over inflate prices.
WildLifeLover
WildLifeLover Female
A month ago
I'm happy to buy supermarket brands in fact I prefer them in most cases. The only thing I won't skimp on is chicken, no way will I buy poor battery hens produce has to be FR.
StillGotIt
StillGotIt Male
A month ago
Price of produce fluctuate throughout the year. If you are adaptable and live off certain products in season then you can dramatically cut cost on many items. It's when the consumer demands a product all year round even when it's not in season that the cost of your weekly shop inflates more.
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
A month ago
I buy very little that requires a brand name, either own label or otherwise.  Most of my shop is for single ingredient items, like fruit veg, chicken, fish, beans, pulses, and the ingredients that I need to cook them with; like herbs and spices, olive oil, g/f flour etc.  Convenience food for me is a bag of frozen peas.   That is also partly why I didn't clock my food intolerances for such a long time, as I eat so little processed food.  Prepared meals and sauces etc are so-called value added items to marketeers and they charge you a premium for them.  It's a fallacy that you can't eat healthily cheaply, providing you have a basic kitchen to make your own food.  Though I recognise that there are some people who do not have that facility, due to their poor living conditions.  My weekly food shop this week came to £26.  I could probably reduce that further, if I had to.
wonderoushen
wonderoushen Female
A month ago
I've not noticed the basics coming down in price, things are still going up.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
A month ago
When households by April could be facing Domestic Energy bills of over £100 a week (unless they radically cut usage) - it will in many cases for poorer households be a question of not only avoiding using Central Heating - or indeed any heating - but maybe also avoiding using a cooker/fridge-freezer/washing machine etc.

By that stage for the very poorest - it could mean a return to the need for daily food shopping as we had up to the 1950s/60s when most households had no fridge.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
A month ago
I do buy certain brands but only a very few.. gravy has to be Bisto original it's vegetarian, brown sauce has to be HP there is no substitute, I only buy one canned soup, that has to be Heinz tomato, like wildlife lover Free Range eggs. All other soup I make from fresh.. my cupboards are usually just ingredients, kidney beans, chopped tomatoes, coconut milk, beans,lentils and pasta, rice, linguini,seeds and nuts all for cooking. 
Samx
Samx Male
A month ago
Thank you fluff for your support and understanding.
Andy: ever since my cancer diagnosis I have planned my life very carefully. After leaving hospital I was given a choice of sheltered flats. The one in a high-rise building l rejected as I would be stranded if the lift failed. One on the outskirts I refused due to the distance for shopping. The one I’m living in now, although very hot, it’s close to the centre of town, which allows me shopping in my second-hand buggy, the size l increased, over time, in anticipation not to be able to drive one day. After the vote on Brexit, I started to buy an extra tin, packet of pasta, etc. every time l went shopping in anticipation of future shortages. I volunteered for the local hospice with regard to be able to die in peace there, rather than the hospital. So, your smirk remarks seem rather unfounded.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
A month ago
I do that too sometimes pick up one or two extra.. especially if it's on offer.. I don't like going into supermarkets much at all, and try to order online, but if I happen to be in one and see something I'll grab it to bulk up stores. 


 Back to top

 Help with conversations