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Water shortages

Stand pipes?

Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
3 months ago
lol @ Andy. Silly!

Maybe, they are like me, their old one has sprung a leek. I wondered if the hot sun and the heat made mine perish.
AndyMacG
AndyMacG Male
3 months ago
Ha ha Well, Minnie you know me, lol

On a serious note though ... Take a look back over the history of this planet over millions of years and with climate in mind its been known for serious changes which has shaped the Earth to how we know it right now, natures own way of putting things right, it might take thousands of years but could this thats happening now have happened at the time just before the dinosaurs were wiped out, just a thought!





Andy Mac
Andromeda
Andromeda Female
3 months ago
I've thought the same during the worst winter we have ever known and think what about the Ice age. That was quite cold too.
FBF_Peace
FBF_Peace Male
3 months ago
If we had todays technology in measuring atmosphere etc many years ago in the distant past I wonder what it would say then and what the predictions would have been. Before the ice age the predictions might have been far worse than anything we could imagine today.
WildLifeLover
WildLifeLover Female
3 months ago
The billions of litres lost through leekage is obscene, the water companies have'nt sorted this out which is disgraceful! We all have to do our bit as well of course though. the young trees growing in the streets need watering, I take the washing-up bowl to my nearest one. Oh and I've put out a bowl of slightly salted water in the  garden for bees (apparently they find it easier when a bit of salt's added) And bowl of water outside the house for dogs and foxes of course. Any more tips from the learned people on here will be greatly appreciated x
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
3 months ago
I leave water for the hedgehogs.  Then I was told that it encourages rats, as they have a very high need for water.  We do have rats, as there are chickens a few doors down and that also attracts them.  Anyway, I decided that I would carry on watering the hedgehogs.  They make me smile.
Mumsie
Mumsie Female
3 months ago
is it not time our scientists turned to desalination of  the sea we as an island are surrounded by Just an old grans thoughts 
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
3 months ago
London does have a desalination plant in Beckton which is used occasionally - downside is the need for horrendous amounts of energy.
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
3 months ago
I think we have that already and they call it rain, mumsie.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
3 months ago
London does have a desalination plant in Beckton which is used occasionally - downside is the need for horrendous amounts of energy.
wonderoushen
wonderoushen Female
3 months ago
Theres a planned desalination plant on the east coast somewhere thats been mothballed for a while now, the idea of desalination plnats have been around for a while now, but as with so many other infrastructure projects, planing for our future water supplies has been kicked into the long grass.
G-O-W
G-O-W Female
3 months ago
'Sfine, none of us are dinosaurs! Or are we?
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
3 months ago
Springing a leek!  That was clever.  A leak, perhaps.
WildLifeLover
WildLifeLover Female
3 months ago
I questioned why we didn't have desalination plants on another forum, and was informed of the harm that would be done to marine life, I'd hate that, the poor sea mammals alredy suffer from all the plastic crap in our waters.
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
3 months ago
We get plenty of rain in this country.  We just don't have sufficient means of collection and storage any longer.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
3 months ago
A lot of the rain off the Atlantic falls in Ireland/Wales/Scotland.

Since 1900 the UK population is up by around 80% - and sanitary habits mean we each use a helluva lot more water than in the former era when a weekly bath was the norm - and often the same bath water shared amongst a whole family.

Overall housing stock more than doubled in the 20thC - and the boom in motoring from the 1950s saw a massive expansion of roads infrastructure - which in combo meant a lot less natural land to absorb any rainfall.
wonderoushen
wonderoushen Female
3 months ago
WLL, did this person say why wild life would be harmed by desalination plants? I would of thought it would depend on where they were sited and what sort of filters they used? A lot of projects get derailed because of presumed environmental harms which when tested don't actually happen.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
3 months ago
According to New Scientist this is why desalination plants are harmful to sea life and wildlife. 


Most of this brine ends up in the sea. In calm conditions, the dense brine can spread out over the sea floor and kill organisms by increasing salinity beyond what they can tolerate, says Callum Roberts at the University of York, UK. The brine is also contaminated with toxic chemicals used to stop sea life clogging pipelines.
ToBeAdvised
ToBeAdvised Male
3 months ago
London does have a desalination plant in Beckton which is used occasionally

The government bodies (DEFRA, DCLG & the Environment Agency) stipulated that the plant should operate only in times of drought, extended periods of low rainfall or to maintain supplies in case of an incident so was only expected to run at about 40% over it's 25 year life span (which it's already half way thorough).
But, although "London" does have this plant at Beckton, it's actually Thames Water's plant and they don't supply water to the whole of Greater London. E.g. In my London Borough the water is supplied by Essex & Suffolk Water, (although we do have to pay Thames Waters expensive sewerage charges to take that water away calculated at 100% of the metered water supplied) so presumably the same would likely apply to all the other counties surrounding London.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
3 months ago
From what I'm reading on a larger scale Desalination plants are very bad for the environment.DESALINATION is growing so fast that the extra salty waste water it produces is becoming a big problem.

There are now 16,000 desalination plants worldwide, creating 142 million cubic metres of brine a day, says a study by Edward Jones of the United Nations University and his colleagues. Over a year, that is enough to cover Florida to a depth of 30 centimetres.
wonderoushen
wonderoushen Female
3 months ago
Shame they can't use the salt from desalination plants, or spread the salt more widely, there is a problem of sea water becoming less salty as water from melting polar icecaps dilutes it.
CircusMaximus
CircusMaximus Male
3 months ago
It's a sad fact that almost anything which benefits mankind in the short term has a detrimental affect on the environment and almost anything which benefits the environment costs mankind a lot of money.
ToBeAdvised
ToBeAdvised Male
2 months ago
"Shame they can't use the salt from desalination plants, or spread the salt more widely, there is a problem of sea water becoming less salty as water from melting polar icecaps dilutes it".

And the potential of that change for UK winter weather and temperatures could be very severe.
We're very fortunate to benefit from the effects of the Gulf Stream. Through the winter months this brings warmer water up from the Atlantic and gives us relatively much warmer winters than other places on our latitude.

The melting ice causes freshwater to be added to the seawater in the Arctic Ocean which flows into the North Atlantic. The added freshwater makes the seawater less dense. This has caused the North Atlantic to become fresher over the past several decades and has caused the currents to slow. These changes may disrupt or stop the pattern of ocean currents which could also affect the direction and strength of the Gulf Stream flowing north across us.

Even the southernmost point of Britain is further north than the northernmost part of the United States (not including Alaska or Hawaii) while London for example lies further north than almost all major Canadian cities and 11° further north than New York and most of these places can have very cold and severe winters.

If we're virtually paralysed with 2 inches of snowfall what's it going to be like if we get 5 inches a day for a week and -18°c temperatures like they regularly get annually in New York City.
wonderoushen
wonderoushen Female
2 months ago
I think if we had a climate rather than weather we'd plan for it better, if we had the sort of snowfall seen in New York or Canada then it would be financially worth investing in top of the range snowploughs and the like. If as at the moment that sort of snowfall is a once a decade or so event and our council spent millions investing in snowploughs that sat in depots for 9 years out of ten, then I'm sure that many would be complaining about wasting money. As it is we have weather that can rarely be predicted with any accuracy, let alone a climate that can.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
2 months ago
If UK had a climate like say Canada - with current energy costs the population would start depleting pdq.


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