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DNAR vs Right to Die

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the-omniscient-beeman
the-omniscient-beeman Male
20 days ago
What do you feel?
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
20 days ago
Its a tough one, I was heartbroken when option was on my aunties records but because of how frail she was and her age and state of mind the DNR box was ticked. It didn't come to that though. But without the option for her to have euthanasia she lingered on for months on end.

I feel that if its that person making the choice for themselves then yes. Its not nice to have to make that decision for someone but you have to be realistic if its a long term situation that will not improve when it comes to DNR or euthanasia, I would want to the option to be euthanised if I were in a terrible end of life condition particularly if it would linger.
Molly
Molly Female
19 days ago
It is a difficult subject when you have reached my age you have probably had plenty of experiences with family and loved ones who have their own ideas of what they want to happen during the final years of their lives.
I have never met anyone who wants to struggle on to the very end regardless of the pain or discomfort. Sometimes it is time to call it a day.
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
19 days ago
If I had any fears of dying, it would be around whether we will still have an NHS for much longer. I don't think much about dying, but what if I got cancer and could not afford treatment? Would I end up dying in terrible pain or would I receive palliative care or would they just euthanase people who can't afford their own care? I don't worry about it, as it may never, happen, but those are my fears. Now that I am no longer "economically active", I can't see this government caring too much and I have no-one to fight my corner when I am too old to do that for myself.
MrQuiet
MrQuiet Male
19 days ago
I'm amazed you feel like the Minnie but that is an awful way to feel. I have every faith in our NHS and believe it will always be with us no matter which government is in charge. I don't think about death but trapped in some accident would probably be my worse nightmare if I did think about it
I do believe in having our own choice to be euthanised.
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
19 days ago
oh, I am very happy that we have the NHS, Mr Q, that's why it concerns me that all this privatisation is going on. I do hope that you are right and that it will always be here. They seem to be selling it off completely. We've seen how all that has gone for other privatised public services. I find a lot of what is going on in the world either scary or depressing atm. Anyway, enough doom and gloom, it's a glorious sunny day here and I am heading out for a lovely walk over the cliffs.
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
19 days ago
oh, I am very happy that we have the NHS, Mr Q, that's why it concerns me that all this privatisation is going on. I do hope that you are right and that it will always be here. They seem to be selling it off completely. We've seen how all that has gone for other privatised public services. I find a lot of what is going on in the world either scary or depressing atm. Anyway, enough doom and gloom, it's a glorious sunny day here and I am heading out for a lovely walk over the cliffs.
FBF_Peace
FBF_Peace Male
19 days ago
Noooooo don't walk over the cliffs lol
Minnie-the-Minx
Minnie-the-Minx Female
19 days ago
okay, I will try to stay on the top then. :D
wonderoushen
wonderoushen Female
19 days ago
I would chose DNR as part of a living will, I would chose euthenasia if I was very ill and couldn't cope anymore.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
19 days ago
I always said in future if I get that bad give me some ecstasy and let me go swimming in the sea.. do not put me in a home to rot.
Samx
Samx Male
19 days ago
I have an arrangement with the local hospice for DNR. I sense that euthanasia legalisation is very much in the offing, just hampered by very negative historic events. Properly administrated there is no problem with it. Three independent doctors, who do not know each other and one of which, it’s a psychiatrist need to be agreeing that this would be the best outcome for the patient. Relatives have no say in the matter.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
19 days ago
As far as affording private treatment - home owners can usually re-mortgage their property - there are various methods of doing that.
the-omniscient-beeman
the-omniscient-beeman Male
19 days ago
Can we not bring re-mortgaging property and costs into it for once. The question was simple and bringing in re-mortgages is irrelevant, or supposed to be what I am posing. It just muddies the waters.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
19 days ago
I'm pretty certain private health care for a serious long term illness would soon burn through your finances. Can you even re-mortgage if you are too sick to work a job?
the-omniscient-beeman
the-omniscient-beeman Male
19 days ago
As a member of the Hot ex-carers club I know that you wouldn't be able to re-mortgage a property anyway. They use up any finances you have until you reach the £13,000 threshold before you get any funding for care.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
19 days ago
Privately funding for Care or Treatment - as I said avails various methods of remortgaging - some use the interest roll up method for those with little or no income - aka EQUITY RELEASE. That way you make no payments while alive

At it's most basic those who are working can re-mortgage to eg fund an extension for a growing family or indeed many other purposes.

Pre Credit Crunch - many people were "using house as wallet" - ie serial remortgaging to release several equity tranches - noting that from 1995 to 2007 property prices quadrupled. Only constraints on basic remortgaging is max LTV and borrowers' incomes.

In nominal terms a Home Counties 3 bed semi went from say £80k in 1995 to over £300k by 2007.

Same property in say 1980 was around £30k and is now increased 15 fold or more - so a young couple buying in early 1980s and now in retirement can be sitting on £500k of total equity.

Post 2013's MMR mortgage lending is much more tightly controlled

Equity release in one of it's many forms will be especially appealing to older people with no dependents/heirs - though that group may also in many cases have substantial savings so have no need to go down that route - unless they have need of a highly experimental/expensive treatment to prolong survival. It is not unknown for the wealthy to buy organs when they are in need of a transplant.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
19 days ago
Privately funding for Care or Treatment - as I said avails various methods of remortgaging - some use the interest roll up method for those with little or no income - aka EQUITY RELEASE. That way you make no payments while alive

At it's most basic those who are working can re-mortgage to eg fund an extension for a growing family or indeed many other purposes.

Pre Credit Crunch - many people were "using house as wallet" - ie serial remortgaging to release several equity tranches - noting that from 1995 to 2007 property prices quadrupled. Only constraints on basic remortgaging is max LTV and borrowers' incomes.

In nominal terms a Home Counties 3 bed semi went from say £80k in 1995 to over £300k by 2007.

Same property in say 1980 was around £30k and is now increased 15 fold or more - so a young couple buying in early 1980s and now in retirement can be sitting on £500k of total equity.

Post 2013's MMR mortgage lending is much more tightly controlled

Equity release in one of it's many forms will be especially appealing to older people with no dependents/heirs - though that group may also in many cases have substantial savings so have no need to go down that route - unless they have need of a highly experimental/expensive treatment to prolong survival. It is not unknown for the wealthy to buy organs when they are in need of a transplant.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
19 days ago
How many people have chemotherapy every year?
Cancer Research’s latest cancer statistics estimate that more than 363,000 people are diagnosed with cancer every year in the UK. The charity estimates that 28% of cancer patients have chemotherapy as part of their primary cancer treatment, meaning roughly 100,000 people are getting chemo every year.

How much does chemotherapy cost in the UK
The cost of chemotherapy in the UK is expensive if one chooses to go privately. The cost varies hugely with individual medical needs but a single round of chemotherapy can cost up to £30,000. Indeed, chemotherapy costs the NHS an estimated £1.4 billion a year.

With the NHS, many would think this means chemotherapy is free in the uk. Although cancer treatment, including chemotherapy, is free on the NHS for anybody living legally in the UK on a settled basis people can incur costs while undergoing treatment.


Those are estimated costs, like I said would soon burn through your finances paying private. Even if you re-mortgaged your home.
the-omniscient-beeman
the-omniscient-beeman Male
19 days ago
@Delboy ffs stop spamming my thread and make your own.
BOYDEL
BOYDEL Male
19 days ago
Currently 63% of UK households are home owners - and a tad over half are now mortgage free.

That group when seeking any form of private healthcare will not be concerned about claiming state benefits - if they want/need some care/treatment and want it quickly they will just pay for it.

Today 75% of UK pensioner households have a mortgage free home - which is relevant as the incidence&prevalence of morbidity increases with age.

That group in many cases will also have substantial final salary type pensions as well as the State Pension - and retired couples in many cases will have far higher household incomes than a lot of working age households.

As for needing Care in a formal Care Home setting - less than 5% of pensioners are actually in a Care Home - though that rises to 17% for those over age 85 - if one lives that long - and most do not. By age 75 around 70% of State Pensioners have passed on - and a similar rate of mortality applies to the next 10 year age band. By age 90 the survivor cohort is down to c.600,000 and that drops to c.14,000 by age 100.
the-omniscient-beeman
the-omniscient-beeman Male
19 days ago
ffs Delboy stop posting crap. Please don't tell me what you can and can't do with regards to my OP. As an Alzheimer's primary carer I know the law and you are posting incorrect information. Please stop lying and misleading to posters.
the-omniscient-beeman
the-omniscient-beeman Male
19 days ago
I could provide the purple DNAR sheet if photos could posted.
the-omniscient-beeman
the-omniscient-beeman Male
19 days ago
Having the very real prospect of neurosurgery it is something I have thought about. Neurosurgery isn't like surgery for a broken shoulder in that if it goes wrong it has the possibility of being corrected. Neurosurgery on the other hand is invasive and they take the damaged section away. There's no turning back and if something goes wrong. That is it. I've always said that if I go ahead with it I want the option of euthanasia. I can't imagine wanting to stay alive paralysed from the neck down for instance. That's why I believe in euthanasia. It's not having to end it that concerns me rather than not being able to have that option available to me. I don't see euthanasia as the right to die per se rather than the freedom of choice of whether I live or die.
eurostar
eurostar Female
19 days ago
It's like when do you do the DNR? My ex was resuscitated twice after a heart attack which left him with lack of oxygen to brain, he lasted another 15 months and then died , he was never the same and was only 60, should he have done one when he was healthy? Before he spent 15 months dying in a confused brain?

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