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It that time again

Fancy another one

Blackjack
Blackjack Male
6 months ago
So who is loking forward to their 4th jab.

Many cannot wait - friend here in Sheffield very keen

4.2 million people infected so plenty of chance for mutations -

Is this save the virus campaine I tought vaccines were meant to kill it!!

Pfizer call theri jab a therapy in the USA making sure it is not callsed a vaccine for legal purposes so it seems

Please remember these remarkable things called vaccies allow people to get and spread the virus as well as incubate it, but it does not make people as ill as one is told they might be, I say tell that to the crowded hospital full of the vaccinated trying to cling onto life.
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
COVID-19 Vaccinations

This section contains information on the total number of COVID-19 vaccinations provided by the NHS in England and information on COVID-19 vaccinations for the current eligible population.

This data is as reported from the National Immunisation Management System (NIMS), and is classified as management information. NIMS is the System of Record for the NHS COVID-19 vaccination programme in England.



Data
Daily COVID-19 Vaccinations

This publication shows the total number of COVID-19 vaccinations administered in England and reported by midnight of the previous date. The data includes all individuals who have been vaccinated in England, even if they are resident outside of England, do not have an NHS number or are no longer alive. This includes vaccinations administered as part of clinical trials.

Daily data is published at 2pm from Monday to Friday. From 21st February 2022, daily data is no longer published at weekends. The daily figures for Saturdays and Sundays will be published on Mondays.

These data are published to ensure timely reporting of the most up to date operational statistics so there will be a slight undercount as more data is reported in the coming days for that period.

This publication includes breakdowns of vaccinations by:

First, second and booster/third doses (cumulative totals)
NHS Region of residence
Age group
Older files can be found on the vaccinations archive page

COVID-19 daily announced vaccinations 25 March 2022

COVID-19 daily announced vaccinations 24 March 2022
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
This publication provides information on people who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 in England and people who live in England but have been vaccinated for COVID-19 outside of England. The figures cover individuals who are eligible for vaccination (those who have an NHS number and are currently alive).

Weekly data is published each Thursday at 2pm. The data is extracted on a Tuesday and covers vaccinations administered up to midnight of the previous Sunday. As with the daily data, there will be a slight undercount as more data is reported in the coming days for that period.

The accompanying Statistical Bulletin contains details of the key findings and background to the vaccination programme.

The weekly publication includes breakdowns of vaccinations by:

1st, 2nd and booster/3rd dose
Age bands with % uptake split by NHS Geographies (NHS Region of residence, Integrated Care Systems (ICSs)/Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) of residence and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) of residence)
Gender by Age band and NHS Region with % uptake
Ethnicity split by NHS Geographies (NHS Region of residence and Integrated Care Systems (ICSs)/Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) of residence)
Age bands split by administrative geographies (Middle-Layer Super Output Areas (MSOA), Lower Tier Local Authority (LTLA) and Parliamentary Constituency of residence)
Residents and staff in all care homes by NHS Region with % uptake
Residents and staff in Older adult care homes by NHS Region and Upper Tier Local Authority (UTLA) with % uptake
Residents and staff in Younger adult care homes by NHS Region and UTLA with % uptake
Social care staff of Domiciliary care providers and non-CQC registered providers by UTLA with % uptake
NHS Trust health care workers (from the Electronic Staff Record) by NHS Region
Clinically Extremely Vulnerable individuals (CEV) by NHS Region with % uptake
Individuals identified as At Risk or a Carer (aged 16-64) by NHS Region with % uptake
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
The majority of the figures in this publication provide information on individuals who are eligible for vaccination (those who have an NHS number and are currently alive) who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 in England or who live in England but have been vaccinated for COVID-19 outside of England, with the following breakdowns:

Age bands split by NHS Region and Ethnicity
Age bands and Gender split by NHS Region and Ethnicity
Ethnicity split by NHS Region of Residence with % uptake for age 12+, age 18+ and age 50+
Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) deciles with % uptake for age 12+, age 18+ and age 50+
NHS Trust Health Care Workers
Individuals identified as At Risk or a Carer (under 65yrs) by NHS Region with % uptake, in the following categories:
Individuals identified as At Risk or a Carer in GP records
Individuals identified as At Risk by the QCOVID Risk Assessment tool
Individuals on the GP Learning Disabilities Register
Individuals receiving the Carer’s Allowance
Individuals identified as unpaid carers by Local Authorities
The publication also includes figures based on all vaccinations administered in England, even if individuals vaccinated are resident outside of England, do not have an NHS number or are no longer alive:

Daily timeseries by date of vaccination of 1st, 2nd and booster/3rd doses by NHS region since 1 January 2021 (since 1 September 2021 for booster/3rd doses)
Vaccination site
All data in the monthly publication covers vaccinations administered up to midnight of the last day of the previous month.
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
Health professionals and teaching and other educational professionals were most likely to have received three vaccinations (31 December 2021). Vaccination rates were highest for the White British ethnic group and lowest for Black Caribbean, Pakistani and Black African ethnic groups (16 September to 31 December 2021).

The majority (76%) of fully-vaccinated contacts of a positive COVID-19 case reported they had undertaken daily lateral flow testing (21 February to 26 February 2022). Of those who undertook daily lateral flow testing, 19% reported testing positive for COVID-19 on one of their tests.

Official data updated daily on the number of people who have received a COVID-19 vaccination are available on the GOV.UK coronavirus dashboard.
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
There are 3 types of booster for the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine:

A 1st booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine is available for everyone aged 16 and over, and some children aged 12 to 15, who have had a 2nd dose of the vaccine at least 3 months ago.
A booster dose (4th dose) of the COVID-19 vaccine is available for anyone who had a severely weakened immune system when they had their first 2 doses and who had a 3rd dose of the vaccine at least 3 months ago.
A spring booster of the COVID-19 vaccine is available to people aged 75 and over, people who live in a care home for older people, or people aged 12 and over who have a weakened immune system.
If you have not had a booster dose yet, you're still eligible and can book anytime.


If you've had a positive COVID-19 test, you need to wait before getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

People aged 18 and over, and eligible children aged 12 to 15, need to wait 4 weeks.

Most young people aged 16 and 17 need to wait 12 weeks.
1st boosters for people aged 16 and over

If you're aged 16 or over and had your 2nd dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at least 3 months ago, you can:

book your COVID-19 vaccination appointment online for an appointment at a vaccination centre or pharmacy – you can pre-book your booster dose if it's been 2 months (61 days) since you had your 2nd dose
find a walk-in COVID-19 vaccination site to get vaccinated without needing an appointment
wait to be contacted by a local NHS service such as your GP surgery and book your appointments with them
If you cannot book an appointment online, you can call 119 free of charge. You can speak to a translator if you need to.

If you have difficulties communicating or hearing, or are a British Sign Language (BSL) user, you can use textphone 18001 119 or the NHS 119 BSL interpreter service.
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
1st boosters for some children aged 12 to 15

Some children aged 12 to 15 can get a booster dose if they had a 2nd dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at least 3 months ago and they either:

have a condition that means they're at high risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19
live with someone who has a weakened immune system
Eligible children can:

book a COVID-19 vaccination appointment online for an appointment at a vaccination centre or pharmacy – you can pre-book a booster dose if it's been 2 months (61 days) since your 2nd dose
find a walk-in COVID-19 vaccination site to get vaccinated without needing an appointment
wait to be contacted by a local NHS service such as your GP surgery and book your appointments with them
If you get vaccinated at a walk-in site, you'll need to bring the letter, text or email inviting you to get a booster dose.

If you do not have an invitation, you can bring a letter from your GP or hospital specialist about your condition, or a letter from the GP or hospital specialist of the person you live with confirming that anyone they live with should get a booster.

Information:
If you're not sure if you or your child are at high risk, see who is at high risk from COVID-19.
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
Etc etc etc.
HotOrWot
HotOrWot Male
6 months ago
The only post on this thread to make any sense is etc etc etc.
HotOrWot
HotOrWot Male
6 months ago
The only post on this thread to make any sense is etc etc etc.
HotOrWot
HotOrWot Male
6 months ago
I pinched this from a thread on here yesterday.

Worth everyone thinking about.

Consider the following guidelines
Will I feel good or different about it later?
Social media comes with one golden rule, don't post when you are angry. A split second of rage can have permanent consequences.

Why am I posting?
Is this something you really want to post, does it really reflect your personality and values? Don't follow the crowd or post just to gain attention, as you might not like the response you get back.

Would I say this in person?
No? Then don't say it online. Social accounts are managed by real people with real feelings. If you talk about someone online, think about whether you would feel embarrassed or ashamed if you saw them in person. If so, you may want to ask again, why am I posting?

Can this be interpreted differently?
Sarcasm and irony do not often transfer well into writing, especially in a short social media post. Think about how others may read it; could it be seen as offensive?

Am I being kind?
Treat others with the respect that you would like to receive yourself. If you read it about yourself, would it make you feel good?

Is it really private?
People often excuse inappropriate posts based on the idea that the conversation is private, as it is on a private account. Consider how many connections you have, are all these people very close friends? Can you trust that each one of them won't share or talk about your post with others? Facebook statistics suggest that the average young user has up to 300 online friends. This private profile suddenly doesn't seem so private at all.

Do I have permission?
You might find that badly angled photograph of your friend amusing, but the likelihood is that they will not. Be respectful of other people's privacy; don't share photos or information that will embarrass or humiliate someone.

Would I like me?
If you were a stranger looking in at your profile, what would you think? If most of your posts are in some way critical, unkind, offensive or negative, how do you think you are being perceived?

Is it legal?
In the eyes of the law, posting online is not the same as having an informal chat with your friends. Posting is publishing, just the same as if it was written in the newspaper. Even if your profile is private, you do not own what you publish - meaning anyone can use it as evidence.

Make sure you do not post anything that might get you into trouble with the law. Harassment, hate speech, threats of violence, ruining someone's reputation and pictures or comments suggesting illegal activity can all be used against you.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
6 months ago
The King and I....

We've had two Pfizer and the booster.. if I have to have a fourth then so be it!
Andromeda
Andromeda Female
6 months ago
The only post on this thread to make any sense is etc etc etc.

That gave me a laugh but so true and I did like the post about internet usage.
Pixiefluff
Pixiefluff Female
6 months ago
I also still wear a mask in a supermarket... :D
NeverSayNever
NeverSayNever Female
6 months ago
How stupid are some posters. Jack is struggling to keep you informed as you obviously do not understand waht is going on and are incapable of studying statistics and facts.
Pixiefluff with her fluffy responses. Andromeda obviously from another galaxy adn tsunami just a lot of wind. It must be too ealy the the other old duffers still in their beds.

Another informative and worthwhile post Jack and we appreciate your efforts when you despise those you are trying to help. Keep up the excellent work my friend. RESPECT!

The midsummer delusionists. Grasping at straws of knowledge adn failing dismally.

Not etc etc etc but stupid stupid stupid.
Jeff
Jeff Male
6 months ago
Russian News Agency Tass tass.com/russia/1427903 (27-Mar-22) includes:-
"Anti-coronavirus vaccination of children between six and 11 years in Russia will start next week within the frames of clinical trials, head of the Gamaleya Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology Alexander Gintsburg told TASS.
"I believe that clinical trials of a vaccine, particularly the vaccine against the coronavirus for children, will start next week," he said. "As of today, we have no list of children, but we have decided on the organization, which has the right to recruit volunteers and select hospitals to hold the clinical trials."
On January 24, the Russian Health Ministry issued a license for clinical tests of a Gamaleya Center’s coronavirus vaccine in children aged from 6 to 11. The ministry reported at that time that tests involving 2,200 children would be organized at three medical establishments in Moscow. Gintsburg announced back then that tests would require a period of three and a half months.
Earlier, the Russian government allocated more than 305.5 million rubles (almost $4 million at the exchange rate of that time) for the Gamaleya Center to test an anti-coronavirus vaccine for children aged 6-11 years. A total of 1,100 volunteers of this age group were expected to take part in the trials.
On November 24, 2021, the Russian Health Ministry authorized the Sputnik M COVID-19 vaccine for young people aged from 12 to 17, consisting of two components. Vaccination of children under the age of 15 requires parental consent, while young people aged over 15 can decide for themselves."

Blackjack, Does Russia want to kill its children?


China Daily chinadaily.com.cn/a/202203/20/WS6236f8b4a310fd2b29e520a3.html (20-Mar-22) includes:-
"BEIJING -- The amount of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered on the Chinese mainland grew by over 4.15 million on Saturday, with the total number reaching over 3.22 billion, data from the National Health Commission showed Sunday."

Blackjack, Does China want to kill its citizens?
Jeff
Jeff Male
6 months ago
An important issue is whether or not the vaccine is effective (although not 100%) and safe (although not 100%).
On 27-Apr-21 at 10:54 I posted including: "Vaccine efficacy is generally reported as a relative risk reduction (RRR). It uses the relative risk (RR) — ie, the ratio of attack rates with and without a vaccine — which is expressed as 1–RR. Ranking by reported efficacy gives relative risk reductions of 95% for the Pfizer–BioNTech, 94% for the Moderna–NIH, 90% for the Gamaleya [Sputnik V], 67% for the J&J, and 67% for the AstraZeneca–Oxford vaccines."


In various threads I've asked you about Covid-19 and its vaccines in Russia. For example, my posts include the following, and were repeated in later posts in other threads, and as usual you never answered my questions:- (On request I'll give the webpages.)

(a) On 02-May-21 at 19:37: "In that thread on 27-Apr-21 at 22:34 I asked Blackjack (1) "Did Putin tell the truth about that?" (that the Sputnik V vaccine had been sufficiently tested by 11 August 2020), and (2) "Should we have waited more years before releasing the vaccines?" (and I've asked Blackjack similar questions in other threads), but of course he didn't answer."

(b) On 17-Jun-21 at 12:25: "Russia’s true death toll from the novel coronavirus pandemic is not about 57,000, as official figures claim, but more than 180,000, the country’s deputy prime minister, Tatiana Golikova, conceded at a press conference ... The figures mean Russia ranks third in the world in terms of deaths from covid-19, behind only the US and Brazil. It would also give Russia the fourth highest per capita death rate"

(c) On 03-Sep-21 at 16:07: "- You falsely wrote "The report also made one other important admission: getting vaccinated to protect others is between somewhat questionable and a total lie." I asked you to quote where it says that - but you couldn't because it doesn't.
- You ignore my questions, based on a RT (Russia Today) article "Does the Russian government want to kill those people? Or is it only the Russian Sputnik V vaccine that is effective?".
- You ignore my points (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) (and my enlarged explanation of (e)) relating to that report.
- You wrote "the vaccinated are more likely to die from a mutation than the unvaccinated" which is completely false, for reasons that I explained in my 3 previous posts.
- You wrote "We also know that censoring information is not just done through altering facts, but mainly through ignoring, downplaying or intentional omission." But you ignore "Huge amounts of evidence around the world show that the vaccines have greatly reduced hospitalisations and deaths."

(d) On 28-Oct-21 at 12:17 "Could you please answer my question: Does that apply to the Chinese vaccines? ... And do your comments apply to the Russian vaccines? (e.g. Sputnik V)"
Maglorian
Maglorian Male
6 months ago
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane."
Marcus Aurelius.
Neros1954
Neros1954 Male
6 months ago
Good Mags but not as good as NeverSayNever lol.
Blackjack
Blackjack Male
6 months ago
Jeff - your forget your position in my estimation - YOU ARE A USEFUL IDIOT - someone I use to continue a particular theme with if I feel like it - for the amusement of others or not – sheep from goats????!!!

You are far too stupid for me to associate with in real life - a complete type of embarrassment to have any association with - hence you are a pretend person – GEDDIT

In real life I tell people like you to f-off to their face in public – I have no shame and make sure everyone in the room or area hears me shout it - it allows them a distraction and for others a escape from boredom. Public humiliation is really where its at for me – which is why women generally tended to keep me indoors away from such opportunities.

Life has or should have taught most males by now they are a complete waste of space, women are not interested in such creatures that hope to offer the poisoned prick on this site.

Just piss off and get your fourth jab a like a good sheep, and hopefully this time after a few days – while in the shower or bath your bollocks will fall off. confirming what you suspected anyway.


I completely approve of his message and it has been passed and authorised by me.
Samx
Samx Male
6 months ago
Why do you use personal insults NeverSayNever? I don’t expect anything else from BlackJack, but think you should be above doing that kind of thing!

Self-preservation requires me to follow the vaccination advice.
But then again I always say: everyone to themselves.
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
Why do you use personal insults NeverSayNever? I don’t expect anything else from BlackJack, but think you should be above doing that kind of thing! Assuming they are two different people and not another of Blackjacks many fake profiles?
tsunamiwarrior
tsunamiwarrior Male
6 months ago
Jeff Sex icon 28-Mar-2022 08:57
Russian News Agency Tass tass.com/russia/1427903 (27-Mar-22) includes:-
"Anti-coronavirus vaccination of children between six and 11 years in Russia will start next week within the frames of clinical trials, head of the Gamaleya Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology Alexander Gintsburg told TASS.
"I believe that clinical trials of a vaccine, particularly the vaccine against the coronavirus for children, will start next week," he said. "As of today, we have no list of children, but we have decided on the organization, which has the right to recruit volunteers and select hospitals to hold the clinical trials."
On January 24, the Russian Health Ministry issued a license for clinical tests of a Gamaleya Center’s coronavirus vaccine in children aged from 6 to 11. The ministry reported at that time that tests involving 2,200 children would be organized at three medical establishments in Moscow. Gintsburg announced back then that tests would require a period of three and a half months.
Earlier, the Russian government allocated more than 305.5 million rubles (almost $4 million at the exchange rate of that time) for the Gamaleya Center to test an anti-coronavirus vaccine for children aged 6-11 years. A total of 1,100 volunteers of this age group were expected to take part in the trials.
On November 24, 2021, the Russian Health Ministry authorized the Sputnik M COVID-19 vaccine for young people aged from 12 to 17, consisting of two components. Vaccination of children under the age of 15 requires parental consent, while young people aged over 15 can decide for themselves."

Blackjack, Does Russia want to kill its children?


China Daily chinadaily.com.cn/a/202203/20/WS6236f8b4a310fd2b29e520a3.html (20-Mar-22) includes:-
"BEIJING -- The amount of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered on the Chinese mainland grew by over 4.15 million on Saturday, with the total number reaching over 3.22 billion, data from the National Health Commission showed Sunday."

Blackjack, Does China want to kill its citizens?






More questions than answers.
Blackjack
Blackjack Male
6 months ago
Well if its not our resident MOLLESTOR tsunamiwarrior up to his old tricks again - love a bit of interfering here and there – and he is never sanction for it, so in with the police it seems - nice to see you again and keep up the good work lots to do and tons to try and destroy -

Regarding your tabloid way of thinking the tantrum childish and pathetic MOLLESTOR we all love and know, have those Russian started roasting babies yet and eating them on camera, surely by now you have evidence.

By the way – my condolences – thanks for the cat skins, but some were in poor condition have you or can you get some black and white ones - have a client who wants a coat of that patterning – see what you can get your hands on please.
MrQuiet
MrQuiet Male
6 months ago
Think before you post

People may behave differently online than they do in person - the large audience is invisible, so many feel protected by their screens. This can be a positive thing, like someone feeling more confident to open up and be themselves. But sometimes people will misuse social networks to shame and bully others.

Posting online is instant, public and more often than not, permanent. Once you post, you lose control of what happens to it - it only takes one friend to share it on their own profiles for it to be completely out of your hands..

The digital world is the real world with real consequences, so make sure you always ask yourself the following before you hit send!

Consider the following guidelines
Will I feel good or different about it later?
Social media comes with one golden rule, don't post when you are angry. A split second of rage can have permanent consequences.

Why am I posting?
Is this something you really want to post, does it really reflect your personality and values? Don't follow the crowd or post just to gain attention, as you might not like the response you get back.

Would I say this in person?
No? Then don't say it online. Social accounts are managed by real people with real feelings. If you talk about someone online, think about whether you would feel embarrassed or ashamed if you saw them in person. If so, you may want to ask again, why am I posting?

Can this be interpreted differently?
Sarcasm and irony do not often transfer well into writing, especially in a short social media post. Think about how others may read it; could it be seen as offensive?

Am I being kind?
Treat others with the respect that you would like to receive yourself. If you read it about yourself, would it make you feel good?

Is it really private?
People often excuse inappropriate posts based on the idea that the conversation is private, as it is on a private account. Consider how many connections you have, are all these people very close friends? Can you trust that each one of them won't share or talk about your post with others? Facebook statistics suggest that the average young user has up to 300 online friends. This private profile suddenly doesn't seem so private at all.

Do I have permission?
You might find that badly angled photograph of your friend amusing, but the likelihood is that they will not. Be respectful of other people's privacy; don't share photos or information that will embarrass or humiliate someone.

Would I like me?
If you were a stranger looking in at your profile, what would you think? If most of your posts are in some way critical, unkind, offensive or negative, how do you think you are being perceived?

Is it legal?
In the eyes of the law, posting online is not the same as having an informal chat with your friends. Posting is publishing, just the same as if it was written in the newspaper. Even if your profile is private, you do not own what you publish - meaning anyone can use it as evidence.

Make sure you do not post anything that might get you into trouble with the law. Harassment, hate speech, threats of violence, ruining someone's reputation and pictures or comments suggesting illegal activity can all be used against you.


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