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Yes Corbyn McDonnell may be a danger to the UK

But what about Seumas Milne.

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Male
tsunamiwarrior  Male  Hertfordshire 21-Aug-2019 15:14 Message #4749212
Labour's director of strategy and communication has emerged as the key figure in Corbyn's office.

In Labour circles, he is described as Corbyn's brain. Or – less flatteringly – Corbyn's Beria, after Stalin's most-feared secret police chief.

Both reflect the immense power Seumas Milne is said to wield at the top of the party, while the second nickname gives a hint of the fear he strikes into those who might find themselves in his path.

Labour's director of strategy and communication has emerged as perhaps the key figure in Jeremy Corbyn's office and in the ongoing internal party debate over the extent to which it should embrace a second referendum.

Milne's background could hardly be more comfortably establishment: he is the son of former BBC director-general and went to public school – Winchester College – before studying PPE at Balliol College, Oxford, where his radical politics had already emerged. Having begun as a Maoist, Milne's politics shifted towards Stalinism, where some of his detractors suggest they've largely stayed.

As comment editor, Milne ran an extract of an address by Osama bin ?Laden as an op-ed article, bylined in Bin Laden's name and put in a standard columnist's slot, three years after the 9/11 attacks – to huge internal and external controversy.

As Guardian associate editor, he attended the Valdai forum – a notorious 'discussion club' for those close to Vladimir Putin's administration – where he spoke with the Russian president on-stage.

Possibly even more friendly with terrorists than multi-millionaire Corbyn himself, another wealthy toff
Male
Beach  Male  Dorset 21-Aug-2019 15:39 Message #4749213
Milne sounds like the Labour equivalent of Boris Johnson's own right hand man, Dominic Cummings, who is formidable, intimidating and left-field in equal measures.

I don't mean mirror opposites or anything. I just mean both leaders appear to have Rottweiler style characters standing by their sides. And I'd, likely, arrange for the same sort of thing if I wanted to consolidate or magnify my own power and / or influence as a leader in a similar position … and wouldn't anybody?
Male
Templar2013  Male  South East London 21-Aug-2019 15:54 Message #4749215
If I were leader having a right hand man who is a rottweiler would be a sensible choice but I don't see much comparison between Cummings and Milne apart fromtheir tenacity which is probably unfair to criticise.

I dont know much about Seumas Milne until looking him up today but there is a lot of information from media, google and wiki which are all quite damning if you don't like your top politicians collaborating with the enemy.
Female
Andromeda  Female  Berkshire 21-Aug-2019 17:57 Message #4749217
Momentum were a big concern when considering voting Labour. It seems Labour are quick to say all the right things but behind the scenes they are a frightening prospect.
Male
Michaelt  Male  Devon 21-Aug-2019 18:00 Message #4749218
Andromeda , An even more frightening prospect is another 5 year term of Tory Government.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd 21-Aug-2019 18:52 Message #4749221
What Beach and Templar said. Dominic Cummings is just as scary or even scarier, I think they're both symptoms of a larger political malaise.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 21-Aug-2019 18:58 Message #4749223
I've always said it's the people in the shadows behind Corbyn that scare me more than Corbyn himself.
If he ever gets into number 10 as caretaker or fully fledged PM, you will see them come bursting from the dark - still, it will be too late for us then...
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 21-Aug-2019 23:18 Message #4749245
Momentum were a big concern when considering voting Labour. It seems Labour are quick to say all the right things but behind the scenes they are a frightening prospect.

Now Milne has joined the scary prospects of the Labour militia.
Male
Beach  Male  Dorset 22-Aug-2019 01:31 Message #4749250
Just got back from Keithy's funeral …

Bit pissed. Bit maudlin … but Jeeeeeez.

What are you talking about?

Politicians scrambling for attention or some kind of pecking order?

I find it difficult attempting to explain the FORCE behind so many folk seeking the limelight.

It is a drug or influence impossible to describe … unless you have experienced it yourself.

There was a time, briefly, when I was the man of the hour and it would have been easy to jump ship, abandon my own, extra-ordinary, rise to celebrity and use that same celebrity to pursue some political outcome … BUT … I was not some human seeking fame for fame's sake and the idea of selling myself was abhorrent then as it is now.

Let me tell you what fame does. (Even local, minor fame).

You go to a supermarket … and people actually accost you and ask you questions about your life.

You take your family / your children along a seaside walk, in my case the Lyme Regis promenade, and strangers recognise you … and ask you questions such as "How does gravity technology actually work?"

OR. (Please appreciate this one).

You drive to the most distant, off the beaten track, public house in the whole of your county, (with some idea of getting your head around your life suddenly becoming public property), and there, in the middle of nowhere, (thinking you are safe and out of the public eye), the local cider heads at the bar come out with; "Hey. I know you. You are that inventor from the TV. The Greedy Monkey guy."

Fame is a nasty thing.

Few ever deal with it positively … no matter how they claim to deal with it.

Sure. Fame can earn you millions (Hell, even without you doing anything profoundly worthy or anything), but fame, also, is such a burden that, (the likes of me), jettison it the very first moment such an opportunity comes along … merely to keep a more worthy, low key, lifestyle alive.

Fame is for losers seeking short term adoration.

Me? I've gone for the long game.

I'll be in the patent record. Associated with Gravity technology for all of eternity.

I don't need or require adoration short term.

As an acclaimed inventor, I'll get it, long term, in the records of future Martian colonists. :-)
Male
Beach  Male  Dorset 22-Aug-2019 01:55 Message #4749253
Sorry for the above.

I may have got a little bit passionate about my, so called, off world projects.

Ignore the above.

I was talking rubbish.

Don't believe my silly aspirations. :-)
Female
Andromeda  Female  Berkshire 22-Aug-2019 07:52 Message #4749259
HotOrWot Male Lancashire 21-Aug-2019 23:18 new Message #4749245
Momentum were a big concern when considering voting Labour. It seems Labour are quick to say all the right things but behind the scenes they are a frightening prospect.

Now Milne has joined the scary prospects of the Labour militia.

I’ve known a lot of awful politicians during my lifetime but this is the first time I have felt a deep evil element as I feel in the present Labour Party.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire 22-Aug-2019 08:58 Message #4749262
I have to admit. I don't know about Milne but he looks amazingly like Blair on is pictures, though that is nothing to do with anything.

Andromeda,

I feel exactly the opposite about the Labour Party, the Corbyn elements, they bring me hope for change and the evil stands exactly where we are now.

Wanting more equality is hardly evil.
Female
Andromeda  Female  Berkshire 22-Aug-2019 09:49 Message #4749266
JustLyn.
I would have been very surprised and a bit disappointed had you not come along to Corbyn's defence. You seem to do this no matter what is being said whether a criticism of Corbyn or the Corbyn elements as you call them. To me it's beyond all comprehension and for the first time in my life I truly fear a political party gaining power and sense an evil element among their members.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire 22-Aug-2019 18:01 Message #4749303
Why would I not defend any injustice?

I have not, as far as I am aware, initiated anything of late on Corbyn, if at all. My responses are only in response to that of others.

So to say "You do this no matter what is being said whether a criticism..." then go on to not actually balance your comment with anything positive, yet you and others who all share the same view seem to expect no respectful challenge to those statements.

I appreciate you have never been offensive or rude, but others have, if certain members have similar beliefs to myself. It is very strange that such people attempt to bully anyone away to what would be conversations full of self back patting and self deception.

I am genuinely sorry if feel and sense such fear from a political party. I don't. I feel such fear from leaders such a May, now Johnson remaining in power. I really do.

I will fight tooth and nail to get change for the better.

Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 22-Aug-2019 20:24 Message #4749319
JustLyn.
I would have been very surprised and a bit disappointed had you not come along to Corbyn's defence. You seem to do this no matter what is being said whether a criticism of Corbyn or the Corbyn elements as you call them. To me it's beyond all comprehension and for the first time in my life I truly fear a political party gaining power and sense an evil element among their members.


Even long term Labour supporters and membership of the ?Labour Party itself fear Corbyn and Corbyn’s cronies.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire 22-Aug-2019 21:15 Message #4749327
HotOrWot,

I agree with your last line, but those people and their cronies fear middle Labour edging back to where Labour was meant to be, more Left and socialist. I think it is what Michaelt means by called those people "conservative". They have had their noses put out of joint and I believe those people like those who ran for leadership themselves and lost feel nudged to one side because most, if not all, had more power under Blair.

I can understand why they "fear" Corbyn and McDonnell from not only their history but how they were ignored as irrelevant, a bit like here when some disagree with the herd. It's a bit like the bullied being made prefect and Corbyn, it was such fun to watch, him getting far more votes and getting huge crowds, even many against Corbyn often admitted they had no idea they had it in him.

But people change. Hopefully we all do. We may have had passion about something in the past, been quite radical, dressed as a punk, been a Hell's Angel, had a bad relationship, but we evolve and learn, become pragmatic. I heard Corbyn say this. I have seen his genuine concern and care with a disabled child.

I am quite an empathic person. I've never been let down by how I feel about a person so I do trust what I feel is sincerity. There's always a first time though, never say never.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 22-Aug-2019 22:23 Message #4749346
Corbyn won’t change he will always side with the terrorist and even if he wanted to the cronies who now surround him wouldn't let him do so.
Male
Witheflow  Male  North Yorkshire 23-Aug-2019 00:52 Message #4749358
Mandella was labelled "a terrorist" by the tory party in the 80's. Your ability to see, is blocked with bigotry and ignorance HotBot. You are clearly frightened stiff at the inevitable General election that's coming this November. But your lies and smears are landing like soggy flannels. Contributing to society fairly, wont kill you HotBot. It's just rebalancing the selfishness neo liberalism unleashed on society. We all have to pay our way eventually. Even the greedy and smear makers (Paper) owners, have to pay the levy man.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 23-Aug-2019 06:06 Message #4749360
Just got back from Keithy's funeral …

Bit pissed. Bit maudlin … but Jeeeeeez.

What are you talking about?

Politicians scrambling for attention or some kind of pecking order?

I find it difficult attempting to explain the FORCE behind so many folk seeking the limelight.

It is a drug or influence impossible to describe … unless you have experienced it yourself.

There was a time, briefly, when I was the man of the hour and it would have been easy to jump ship, abandon my own, extra-ordinary, rise to celebrity and use that same celebrity to pursue some political outcome … BUT … I was not some human seeking fame for fame's sake and the idea of selling myself was abhorrent then as it is now.

Let me tell you what fame does. (Even local, minor fame).

You go to a supermarket … and people actually accost you and ask you questions about your life.

You take your family / your children along a seaside walk, in my case the Lyme Regis promenade, and strangers recognise you … and ask you questions such as "How does gravity technology actually work?"

OR. (Please appreciate this one).

You drive to the most distant, off the beaten track, public house in the whole of your county, (with some idea of getting your head around your life suddenly becoming public property), and there, in the middle of nowhere, (thinking you are safe and out of the public eye), the local cider heads at the bar come out with; "Hey. I know you. You are that inventor from the TV. The Greedy Monkey guy."

Fame is a nasty thing.

Few ever deal with it positively … no matter how they claim to deal with it.

Sure. Fame can earn you millions (Hell, even without you doing anything profoundly worthy or anything), but fame, also, is such a burden that, (the likes of me), jettison it the very first moment such an opportunity comes along … merely to keep a more worthy, low key, lifestyle alive.

Fame is for losers seeking short term adoration.

Me? I've gone for the long game.

I'll be in the patent record. Associated with Gravity technology for all of eternity.

I don't need or require adoration short term.

As an acclaimed inventor, I'll get it, long term, in the records of future Martian colonists. :-)


A bit of a ramble Mr Beach.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 23-Aug-2019 06:07 Message #4749361
Labour's director of strategy and communication has emerged as the key figure in Corbyn's office.

In Labour circles, he is described as Corbyn's brain. Or – less flatteringly – Corbyn's Beria, after Stalin's most-feared secret police chief.

Both reflect the immense power Seumas Milne is said to wield at the top of the party, while the second nickname gives a hint of the fear he strikes into those who might find themselves in his path.

Labour's director of strategy and communication has emerged as perhaps the key figure in Jeremy Corbyn's office and in the ongoing internal party debate over the extent to which it should embrace a second referendum.

Milne's background could hardly be more comfortably establishment: he is the son of former BBC director-general and went to public school – Winchester College – before studying PPE at Balliol College, Oxford, where his radical politics had already emerged. Having begun as a Maoist, Milne's politics shifted towards Stalinism, where some of his detractors suggest they've largely stayed.

As comment editor, Milne ran an extract of an address by Osama bin ?Laden as an op-ed article, bylined in Bin Laden's name and put in a standard columnist's slot, three years after the 9/11 attacks – to huge internal and external controversy.

As Guardian associate editor, he attended the Valdai forum – a notorious 'discussion club' for those close to Vladimir Putin's administration – where he spoke with the Russian president on-stage.

Possibly even more friendly with terrorists than multi-millionaire Corbyn himself, another wealthy toff


Good information. Some are sucked in by Corbyn’s cronies and their lies.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd 23-Aug-2019 10:20 Message #4749403
HorW, is it absolutely nessecary to C&P and put in bold any post you wish to reply too? Especially when its a one line reply, it makes threads really hard to read.
Male
Witheflow  Male  North Yorkshire 23-Aug-2019 10:35 Message #4749409
Obsessive Plagiarism alert
Male
Witheflow  Male  North Yorkshire 23-Aug-2019 10:35 Message #4749410
Obsessive Plagiarism alert
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 23-Aug-2019 11:15 Message #4749411
HorW, is it absolutely nessecary to C&P and put in bold any post you wish to reply too? Especially when its a one line reply, it makes threads really hard to read.

My apologies. I seem to have caught the Obsessive Plagiarism bug.
Male
Michaelt  Male  Devon 23-Aug-2019 11:38 Message #4749412
JustLyn , When Blair took Labour to the right and embraced Thatcher's neo-liberal right wing free-market agenda from 1997, , the Blairite's then took hold of a party that had its roots in equality and fairness.

Being comprehensive, New Labour lead by Blair and Brown continued the neo-liberal agenda of tax cuts at the top, means tested handouts for the rest of us, and trickle down economics based on low income tax from British workers as investment into our vital services, to pave the way for continued privatisations.

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