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GCSEs are a form of child abuse by the state

Claims Edward Lucas

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Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 11-Jul-2019 22:14 Message #4744635
... writing in The Times.
Imposing huge, pointless stress on pupils in their mid-teens is perverse and uniquely British

13.3% of 16 – 19-year-olds have suffered from anxiety (neurotic episode) - Anxiety UK.

Isn't it time that all these Stress Tests were abolished as they are completely artificial favouring memory rather than understanding and analysis?
Male
NotHermit  Male  Derbyshire 11-Jul-2019 23:33 Message #4744659
Dunno
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 11-Jul-2019 23:50 Message #4744663
A remarkable situation.
Male
NotHermit  Male  Derbyshire 12-Jul-2019 00:02 Message #4744666
Have you trapped anything yet?
Male
SQL  Male  Devon 12-Jul-2019 08:53 Message #4744691
Are you inviting comments, defence, alternative solutions or do you just have too much time on your hands?

SQL
Male
OnlineMSE  Male  Essex 12-Jul-2019 09:09 Message #4744693
Yes exams are tough. But then so is studying through 5 years of secondary school to get you to the point where you are prepared for them.
If you put in the hours and work hard, you'll hopefully have a good chance at success. If you spend the time p155ing around and treating it as a joke then you're not going to reap the benefits and you'll possibly continue to struggling.
Boo-Hoo nobody said school is easy but then life outside school is stressful and tough, and everyday is a test.
Some of which you're prepared for and some which you're not and if they think that being in school is stressful, well as Bachman-Turner-Overdrive said "you ain't seen nothing yet".
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 12-Jul-2019 09:59 Message #4744694
I agree with some of what you write. However, how realistic is it to test all those years of learning in a (relatively) short time sitting an examination?
Wouldn't it be far better to have Stage tests to ascertain that pupils are grasping each rung of the knowledge ladder and making good use of their learning?
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd 12-Jul-2019 11:13 Message #4744719
I agree that the exam system needs drastic change, to sit an exam in the worst of the hayfever season is going to adversly effect how well you do if you're a sufferer, not everybody does well in exams anyway, I think it was wrong to have taken the coursework element out of the overall mark. Exams test one sort of ability, to recall information and transmit it in a short space of time, course work tests thoroughness of research, research skills, presentation of the results of your research and what to leave out and what to leave in. Both are important skills, its said that boys do better in exams and girls do better in course work, do the boys actually remember the stuff they've crammed? IS this a crude way of redressing the imbalance of why boys overall tend to do worse at school than girls? What stops girls from remembering information for exams?
Male
barney  Male  Surrey 12-Jul-2019 13:16 Message #4744752
My grandson has just finished school.
When at school his day started at 07 30 and finished at 7 00 pm with homework in the evenings and weekends.
He passed all of his exams and is now waiting to be accepted into the RAF who will pay for him to attend university and eventually becoming a fighter pilot.
Whilst at school he studied and took flying lessons as well as becoming a member of the RAF cadets.
If you want something you have to put the work and effort into it.
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 12-Jul-2019 17:03 Message #4744765
SQL 12-Jul-2019 08:53

One can but assume that you failed the "11 plus" examination or the Headteacher refused to let you enter to protect the reputation of the school.
Male
SQL  Male  Devon 12-Jul-2019 17:35 Message #4744770
Good2BWith - 12-Jul-2019 17:03

One can but assume that you failed the "11 plus" examination or the Headteacher refused to let you enter to protect the reputation of the school.

Can one really - from what I have written?

Mensa classes me rather differently, I have found some of their tests a bit trivial (no - not joking !).

Oh dear I forgot the instruction DON'T FEED THE TROLLS - sincere apologies, I'll try to remember next time.

SQL
Male
SQL  Male  Devon 12-Jul-2019 18:02 Message #4744774
wonderoushen - 12-Jul-2019 11:13

I agree with some of your offering but there is a problem with coursework in that the person doing the marking will be unavoidable biassed. With the best of intentions what teacher is going to mark down any of his/her pupils when it will reflect on their own performance?

Regarding the last part of your posting, I attended an interesting talk yesterday given by Prof Gina Rippon about the 'gendering' of children's brains. She is very strongly of the opinion that nurture has the overwhelming influence on the development of children and the perceived lack of involvement of girls in science. She has written a book (I've not read it), a review is given at:

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/mar/02/the-gendered-brain-by-gina-rippon-review

I have also interesting tale on the treatment of women in science/technology. In our locality there lives a person who has significant experience in scientific research and has written papers on renewable energy generation (this person is classed by Mensa as a genius). Several years ago this person decided to undergo gender re-assignment from male to female. Since the process she has submitted papers on renewable energy and has had them rejected out-of-hand because she now has a female name. History is littered with this happening to female authors but it also happens in the science community so what chance do the girls in secondary education have?

SQL
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd 12-Jul-2019 18:50 Message #4744776
Course work marking for exam purposes are given an overview by the examiner, or at least that was the case at uni where 30% of the marks were course work based and 70% exam based. One of the other complaints about a coursework component in exams is that someone else has done the work, either a parent, private tutor or an essay factory, it will soon show up in an exam if someone dosen't know their subject, when they've had previous high grades. Its not just a problem in state schools, so many of the privately educated who I met at uni were so used to being spoon fed by teachers and not allowed to fail and therefore learn from mistakes, that they seemed at a greater disadvantage from those who had come through the state system.

I read Gina Rippon's book and very interesting it is too, along with a book on the same subject by Cordelia Fine, I agree with both of them about gendered brains being something imposed by nurture and not nature, as both have pointed out the figures given for gender differences in the brain are way out of proportion to those that show no difference.

I agree that women in all sorts of roles have been and are discriminated against, we need existing legislation to be used properly and to challenge discrimination, most of all we need men to challenge other men when they see them discriminating against women or anyother group for that matter.
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 12-Jul-2019 21:02 Message #4744792
SQL - 12-Jul-2019 17:35 - Message #4744770

One's score at Mensa is the result of an IQ exam.
One's score in an IQ exam is a measure of how good one is at doing IQ tests.
Nothing else.
As is obvious from your blind following of the instruction DON'T FEED THE TROLLS issued by a blatant thief of other people's efforts. (Even tho' you forgot to do that on this occasion.)

Female
Judance  Female  Berkshire 12-Jul-2019 22:16 Message #4744826
As someone who spent all her working life teaching children who had to sit first GCE/CSE and now GCSE, I do find some of the comments here a bit ill-informed.

Pupils are tested regularly throughout their school careers by school exams / SATS as well as GCSE and A level. The GCSE exams are not a test of pure memory or rote learning but contain questions needing an understanding as well as learnt facts. Reasoning and problem-solving skills are also tested.

With coursework/fieldwork, although the teacher may mark the work, there is a very strict mark scheme that has to be adhered to. Prior to marking their are meetings where teachers from all schools in the area taking those exams are taken through what is required to achieve a certain grade. There are further meetings where examples of students work are taken and marked by everyone present to agree a level. Following that, each teacher will make sure that all students' work is marked at the right level. Even then, once the final grades are submitted, the examiner will call in samples of the work, usually at the grade boundaries, and check to make sure the marks are appropriate. If s/he thinks there has been a mis-mark, all other pupils grades from the school will be altered accordingly.

Regarding 'stage tests' .. we have the National Curriculum levels where each pupil's work is marked on a regular basis against a national standard.

My grandchildren can tell you exactly where they stand in relation to National Levels whether 'working towards' 'performing at' or performing above' in each subject marked. I'm glad I'm not a Primary School teacher in today's world, where each lesson has to have a way of demonstrating achievement in relation to NC performance.
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 12-Jul-2019 23:13 Message #4744838
Judance 12-Jul-2019 22:16

Thank you for a MOST informative post.

That which you write coincides with the rigorous system that was followed by the then:
Joint Matriculation Board of the Universities of Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Sheffield and Birmingham (JMB)
My particular interest was the JMB's UETESOL (University Entrance Test of English for Speakers of Other Languages).
The view of the Board was that English is a dynamic, living language. A very rich language with approximately One Million 'recognized' words.
Considerations of that which is "correct" and that which is "not" in examination answers must also change WITH the language.
Grade determining criteria were subject to intense scrutiny and clearly delineated.
Multi-marking and sampling were as you describe.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 12-Jul-2019 23:16 Message #4744839
As someone who spent all her working life teaching children who had to sit first GCE/CSE and now GCSE, I do find some of the comments here a bit ill-informed.

Pupils are tested regularly throughout their school careers by school exams / SATS as well as GCSE and A level. The GCSE exams are not a test of pure memory or rote learning but contain questions needing an understanding as well as learnt facts. Reasoning and problem-solving skills are also tested.

With coursework/fieldwork, although the teacher may mark the work, there is a very strict mark scheme that has to be adhered to. Prior to marking their are meetings where teachers from all schools in the area taking those exams are taken through what is required to achieve a certain grade. There are further meetings where examples of students work are taken and marked by everyone present to agree a level. Following that, each teacher will make sure that all students' work is marked at the right level. Even then, once the final grades are submitted, the examiner will call in samples of the work, usually at the grade boundaries, and check to make sure the marks are appropriate. If s/he thinks there has been a mis-mark, all other pupils grades from the school will be altered accordingly.

Regarding 'stage tests' .. we have the National Curriculum levels where each pupil's work is marked on a regular basis against a national standard.

My grandchildren can tell you exactly where they stand in relation to National Levels whether 'working towards' 'performing at' or performing above' in each subject marked. I'm glad I'm not a Primary School teacher in today's world, where each lesson has to have a way of demonstrating achievement in relation to NC performance.


Very good post Judance.
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 13-Jul-2019 00:31 Message #4744864
*Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... *
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 13-Jul-2019 00:34 Message #4744865
Or even

Lazy - Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ...
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 13-Jul-2019 00:37 Message #4744867
Or even

Lazy - Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ...
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 13-Jul-2019 00:38 Message #4744868
*Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... Plagiarist Alert ... *
Male
Beach  Male  Dorset 13-Jul-2019 05:09 Message #4744886
DON'T FEED THE TROLLS

Ha ha.

I'll not address it personally but ...

Leave plagiarism aside and admire, instead, the structure and repetition of the trolls pedantry.

Fascinating … but it knows no other method of communication.

DON'T FEED THE TROLLS
Male
Good2BWith  Male  West Yorkshire 13-Jul-2019 10:40 Message #4744908
Spam - Barefoot in the Head - Brian Aldiss
Male
MrQuiet  Male  Northamptonshire 13-Jul-2019 14:46 Message #4744934
Is it plagiarism when a poster copy and pastes a post and thanks the original writer? I would say not.
Female
Judance  Female  Berkshire 13-Jul-2019 19:35 Message #4744975
Surely it’s only plagiarism if the poster claims the words to be their own?

Quite flattered that someone thought my post worth repeating ...

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