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The countryside

Male
terry  Male  West Yorkshire
15-Nov-2020 08:31 Message #4797929
Do you see it as a tool, or a commodity, or a workplace, or something else? Should the countryside be open for all to use? or do we have ideas about rights with access? do you see it similar to your garden (for those who have gardens) where you - and I - might not like any people just strolling through it at will?
Is land something we all own or something only select people own?
Male
tumbled  Male  Gloucestershire
15-Nov-2020 08:49 Message #4797930
I'd probably be one of those who puts on my best barbour anorak, slings my best shotgun over me shoulder. and says in my best farmer accent 'GET ORF MY LARND'
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
15-Nov-2020 10:18 Message #4797949
As we get more population levels, it seems to add to the conflict.

On the one hand we should have freedom to roam, but as I alluded to on your other thread, we have an increasing amount of people not "trained" in being socially responsible.

We seem to have become a nation of personal choice, even if such choices causes damage to someone or something else, such as tramping across fields when you are supposed to walk around the edge.

I was with one dog walker who didn't think he had to pick up his dog's poo in a field where cows graze, until I explained that since a dog is an omnivore, and eats meat, it's excrement holds potentially much more harmful live matter than that of a herbivore such as a horse or cow.

I think I mentioned recently that on walking the dog locally, into areas such as shared routes with National Cycle Routes, walkers seem to have to go everywhere with a large coffee in hand. It looks so weird, hand out, adorned with with huger plastic/paper cup, heading off into the wilderness where there are no bins to dispose of such items. Now we have people complaining there are no bins up Snowden!
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London
15-Nov-2020 10:26 Message #4797950
I would say my thoughts and observations are much the same as yours JustLyn.

I think we should have the right to roam reasonable and responsibly and I think most farmers and landowners would respect that but it's those who are neither reasonable or responsible who create problems for others.

Although having useful facilities is ... useful ... I have never understood why anyone could possibly NEED a bin for rubbish or dog poo. If there isn't one then surely you take your rubbish home to dispose of.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
15-Nov-2020 11:01 Message #4797956
I mostly agree with Lyn, I do wish there were more bins though and that people would use those that are there.

I have an issue with dog poo bags, single use plastic, dog poo will degrade fairly quickly and plastic take decades or even thousands of years to degrade, obviously we don't want to go back to the days of dog poo all over the place, but I think we have to have a sense of balance to it. I think I'd rather see dog poo in a field or park than hanging off bushes in plastic bags, I mean whats the point?

The other one that gets me is that there are a few houses on footpaths round here, the house owners go mental at anyone dogs or people going on their land/garden, but none of them have gates or fences, nothing to even suggest that it private property.
Female
Andromeda  Female  Berkshire
15-Nov-2020 11:56 Message #4797967
I don't walk far but I get a lot of walkers and dog walkers on the footpath by my house. It's where I dog walk too. I'm no expert on poo but I have always thought that dog poo could be disposed off by throwing it under a hedge and not using a bag or taking it away.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
15-Nov-2020 18:14 Message #4798014
Oh dear, sorry Terry, I didn't mean to mention dog poo as a whole conversation but it is relevant to many of us enjoying the countryside and the abuse of it.

I happen to agree with both WH and Andromeda on plastic bags for disposal of that which mentioned above, and have a sliding scale of picking it up. I was pleased the National Trust at Hebden Bridge, Hardcastle Craggs, actually ask dog walkers not to use bags but flick with a stick, to a place (and there are plenty of them) places where little feet cannot tread, children that is, not paws.

I would pick up on an cattle occupied field after reading the risks, but I follow the National Trust recommendation in suitable areas such as under a hedge etc. I was joking with my partner on a recent walk that I had become quite adept at with my foot action, after noting consistency and angle of shot so my boots don't get messy.

Change of subject perhaps?
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia
15-Nov-2020 18:54 Message #4798022
A footpath is purely that though isn't it, a path? When a footpath crosses a farmer's field or someone's land, you, and your dogs, are supposed to stick to the path.
We used to cut a 3 foot wide strip across a wheat field with a lawnmower for that very reason and people still walked wherever they liked...
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
15-Nov-2020 19:19 Message #4798028
Yes, Hierophant, you're right, always keep to the path, but I meant when roaming, there isn't a path at all. It's often a challenge to find one's way out of a huge field, even if there is a style implying the end of a footpath goes on into the field.

I was lost quite recently, couldn't see any exit, so kept to the periphery. Didn't have a dog on that occasion. There's often no evidence anyone has been there as grass is undisturbed.
Male
terry  Male  West Yorkshire
15-Nov-2020 22:02 Message #4798053
Dog poo and finding styles to exit fields are both fair comment, and litter is a major problem - the things I'm noticing more of now are face masks.
Something else I've noticed more and more are landowners putting up 'Private Land' signs, even where there is a marked footpath goes through it...this partly prompted my question. Have to say though, so far most of the farmers/landowners I've come across have been reasonably friendly and accepting, but I wonder if that's changing?
Female
NoSaint  Female  Devon
15-Nov-2020 22:37 Message #4798057
Is it a case of the more unruly the walkers are the more 'Private Land' signs go up to keep them in check.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
16-Nov-2020 11:01 Message #4798095
Probably more people using the countryside for pleasure who think its nice that their dogs are playing with the sheep, who don't understand that its not a good idea to go into a field with a bull, that gates should be shut and to pick up thier litter and take it home with them.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia
16-Nov-2020 11:10 Message #4798097
Why on earth would you wear a face mask out in the countryside?...
Male
terry  Male  West Yorkshire
16-Nov-2020 14:05 Message #4798111
Sorry, I should have explained better; the face masks are littering, although I have seen a few walkers wearing them though don't know why, especially when they don't wear gloves or hand coverings and they're far more likely to catch or spread anything by touching gates etc. than by breathing.

I started noticing the rise in 'Private Land' signs before this virus took hold NoSaint so I'm guessing it has little, if anything to do with Covid.
An interesting thing happening though is the government announced 40 million quid countryside spending, and are talking of increasing the numbers of National Parks....maybe I need to rethink my political leanings? (that's a joke by the way)

Does anyone think it would be a good idea to increase the numbers of countryside wardens?

Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia
16-Nov-2020 14:18 Message #4798113
If people are dumping masks in the countryside it's a fair assumption they are wearing them. Unless they are walking around with a pocket full and decide to chuck them, which is also likely.

I think it was Blair who brought in the "right to roam" thing, something I don't really agree with.
Footpaths are fine, but I don't see why a landowner should tolerate people walking all over their land, just because it's the countryside.
I've mentioned before about my time in farming where the people living in houses that backed onto our fields would take it upon themselves to install gates in the fence so they could access the field. Mostly this was to dump grass cuttings and suchlike because they were too lazy to get rid of them in the proper way.
I wonder how they would feel if their neighbour installed a gate and walked into their garden as and when they liked?
Inevitably, these same people were the ones who moaned about the dust when it was time to combine the crop in the same field....
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
16-Nov-2020 16:17 Message #4798119
Some anxious people wear masks outside because they would perhaps be shielding, maybe severe asthma or frail. When you see people complaining on sites like cycling UK, that heavy breathing cyclists are spreading the virus, then I guess it is only by degrees, and they feel they are reducing the risk.

During the first lockdown, I noticed a few pedestrian stand back as I cycled past.

I think a lot of masks just get pulled out of pockets like handkerchiefs, not all but some.

As for right to roam, it was a famous protest on Kinder Scout that changed the law.

"Kinder Scout was the site of a mass trespass in 1932. The freedom to roam, or " everyman's right ", is the general public's right to access certain public or privately owned land, lakes, and rivers for recreation and exercise. The right is sometimes called the right of public access to the wilderness or the " right to roam "."
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedomtoroam
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London
16-Nov-2020 17:58 Message #4798124
You do get some people who seem to be wearing their masks all the time they are outside which is fair enough particularly if they are on busy pathways. I'm often in London and they certainly do wear a lot of masks in the city as well as on the buses and trains.

It is a good thing that there are some rights to roam otherwise I'm sure many landowners would put up high fences and cut of huge swathes of lands from anyone accessing. I don't blame the landowners putting up signs which insist walkers keep to the paths and keep dogs on leads when necessary to protect animals.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
16-Nov-2020 18:43 Message #4798127
I think a lot of the right to roam stuff was as much a restoration of existing rights as the creation of new ones.

I keep seeing discarded masks all over the place, especially in car parks.
Male
MrQuiet  Male  Northamptonshire
17-Nov-2020 08:06 Message #4798147
I've been put for a walk across the fields this morning. Passed a couple of dog walkers but everywhere clean and tidy and the air feels fresh.

Lovely.
Female
Andromeda  Female  Berkshire
17-Nov-2020 08:19 Message #4798148
MrQ. I returned from my dog walk this morning feeling refreshed. There's something about the early mornings.
Male
Neros1954  Male  Devon
17-Nov-2020 11:40 Message #4798156
I'm glad we can still enjoy our country walks and even do so with a friend.
Male
FirmButFair-TrollPatrol  Male  North Yorkshire
21-Nov-2020 17:54 Message #4798574
A part of me feels that the countryside belongs to all of us but I appreciate that life cannot be so simple and that some land owners have good reasons to fence of their property or control how strangers behave on it.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia
21-Nov-2020 18:01 Message #4798575
Why not apply that thinking to towns and cities too? Your home and garden for example....


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