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Got me a little mobility scooter

Female
Aely  Female  Hampshire
13-Oct-2020 20:52 Message #4795073
With the Covid I haven't been doing the Pilates or getting my usual excercise walking round the supermarket. The dodgy tendon in my right hip has been playing up, my back is suffering and my feet are as usual causing me pain, in spite of the reduced walking. Added to that, I have been really missing my motorcycle while I have been unwilling to use the buses (which get crowded out with germy 6th form sudents from the local college). Actually I've been really missing my motorcycle for over 20 years now! Not that I could get on and off with my dodgy tendon. Even a pushbike got problematic a couple of years ago.

So I've got me a mobility scooter. It's the same colour as my motorbike was! Nostalgic. I tried it out on Sunday, went down my allotment, did some digging, clearing up, and filled the scooter's basket with cooking apples, the last beans, semi-ripe toms and Swiss Chard. Usually by the time I walk there I am half knackered. This time I did twice my normal work in less time and did not dread the journey home as I usually do. I normally crawl home, back shrieking if I have a full bag, feet complaining about touching the ground and am virtually unable to move once I do get home.

The scooter is fine. It goes a little bit faster than I can walk on a good day (it does 3.8 mph, I do about 2.5 mph when fresh and fit) but Oh Dear! I knew the pavements were bad, sometimes throwing me off balance when walking, but for a scooter they are horrific! Where people have turned their front garden into a car park the pavement goes up and down like a sloping switchback, threatening to tip the scooter over sideways. Where it is "flat" it has been dug up and patched so much it tosses the scooter around quite alarmingly.

"Use it or lose it" the saying goes. So the scooter is a bit of fun luxury, mainly to get my digging done and get me to the chiropodist and back. I can't use it for a while now as it takes a bit of effort to get it in and out of the house even with rampy bits and pieces and I mustn't pull my stitches. But come healed back and better weather my allotment will get dug for another year.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
14-Oct-2020 09:21 Message #4795105
Have you ever tried an E-bike?

There are step through models, with chunkier tyres, and in many areas now it is acceptable to go slowly on a shared pavement, but at least on straightforward roads, you can do away with kerbs. They also have variable power levels so you can choose to put in as much or little effort as you feel.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
14-Oct-2020 11:01 Message #4795114
Sounds like a good purchase Aely, if you can get to more places safely and with the allotment do more when you get there, then its a win win.
Male
vanman  Male  Cambridgeshire
14-Oct-2020 11:54 Message #4795125
It will change your life! lol
Is it one that comes apart, to fit in car boot? ( Usually 5 parts, incl basket, battery is heaviest! Other sections are quite light)

If so, may be as well to take it apart to get it indoors easier.
Only takes a few mins, and you can pretend your a racing car mechanic, seeing how quick you can take it apart/put it together! Lol ;-)

There'll be no stopping you now! lol. A bag at the back for extra Lottie produce, learn to control it one handed, so you can hold a brolly, or a cape that covers you and scooter, and can still drive it when it rains! :-)

They used to have a 'Mobility Scooter Races' day, around the market
square, in local town here, would you like me to enter you for the next one? lol ;-)
Couple of clips, for holding hoe, rake, fork, spade ect.
Female
NoSaint  Female  Devon
14-Oct-2020 22:37 Message #4795168
I'm surprised we don't see many more mobility scooters in town.
Male
Orson  Male  Tayside
15-Oct-2020 14:56 Message #4795235
One hopes that dear Aely drives with caution. Since lockdown and its continuing restrictions one has enlisted the help of local young people. Being carried by masked juveniles is giving them a sense of purpose and community spirit. One imagines.
Female
Aely  Female  Hampshire
15-Oct-2020 14:58 Message #4795236
It does come apart but I haven't tried that yet. And it will fit in a car boot although I haven't tried that yet either. Originally I was going for the Guildford University developed efoldi pavement/road scooter which folds up into a "case on wheels" which can be pulled around. However I decided to go for a pavement 4 wheeler, not a trike, for stability - and I'm glad I did with the pavements being so bad and the roads so busy.

I did consider an electric bike but was warned by the shop that they were heavy and they are quite long. If I could get one inside I would not have room for it in my hallway and don't have a waterproof outside storage place. Also I couldn't try one for size and getting on and off as they only kept a man's bike in store. The "lightweight" scooter just fits comfortably in the space available.

The supplier was very good. The original scooter I ordered proved too heavy for me to get inside and out safely. They took it away again and 2 days later turned up with this one for me to try plus a selection of ramps.
Female
Aely  Female  Hampshire
15-Oct-2020 17:38 Message #4795251
Delighted to see you, dear Orson, as always x
Male
fosy  Male  Leicestershire
15-Oct-2020 22:34 Message #4795270
i dropped in at skeggy recently and i couldnt believe how many mobility scoots were flying around... it was, at times, like wacky races.

i did wonder though are they just becoming another means of transport for some ?
i would watch them park up, get off and walk away with no obvious sign of discomfort, their gait being what one might consider normal.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire
15-Oct-2020 22:44 Message #4795273
You wouldn't have to look disabled or be disabled to find a mobility scooter necessary for anything other than very short walks.
Male
fosy  Male  Leicestershire
15-Oct-2020 22:51 Message #4795277
not always short walks....
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire
15-Oct-2020 22:53 Message #4795279
Are you following them? LOLOL.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire
15-Oct-2020 22:54 Message #4795280
Seriously. If you can walk for one hundred yards but live half a mile or more away from the shops then a mobility scooter is ideal. I don't think many people ride them for fun.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
16-Oct-2020 12:54 Message #4795326
With conditions like arthritis, severe kidney disease, unstable angina, multiple sclerosis, myalgic encephalopathy, you do not usually look disabled. It is using something like a mobility scooter that preserves the energy or physical stress than enables the person to manage a walk at their destination. Several of the conditions are variable, and the person might just need the security of knowing they can get back home.

Male
MrQuiet  Male  Northamptonshire
16-Oct-2020 16:40 Message #4795335
Anything which gives people more mobility and the ability to get to shops or out in the fresh air.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
16-Oct-2020 18:39 Message #4795337
I think the independence something like a mobility scooter gives has got to be good for mental as well as physical health.


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