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How Boris

Make us thin?

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Male
Kimjongun  Male  South Yorkshire
26-Jul-2020 13:34 Message #4787770
How he do that?
Why he not do it himself?
Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex
26-Jul-2020 13:44 Message #4787772
Boris has lost over a stone. I think getting covid19 is likely the most effective way.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
26-Jul-2020 15:12 Message #4787782
Boris is likely never to have a BMI below 30 at his age - and it's well known in medical profession that losing weight from middle age onwards is notoriously challenging as from around age 50 ish the body biases fat over muscle production.
Male
Colonel_Blink  Male  Buckinghamshire
26-Jul-2020 16:28 Message #4787787
It can only be a good thing to have fewer obese people. Like many others, including Boris, I have always advocated a think for yourself policy but with the growing risks from being overweight including the risks with Covid I would agree with anything that might help.
Female
eurostar  Female  Merseyside
26-Jul-2020 16:47 Message #4787788
A lot of people have put weight on during lockdown, nowhere to go and too scared to go out for many, home deliveries from food shops, buying too much just in case, and self motivation getting lower each day,
Male
Kimjongun  Male  South Yorkshire
26-Jul-2020 18:38 Message #4787796
My mechanic come to work on one of my cars, just after lockdown.
I had to give him trousers, because his work trousers split!
Male
fosy  Male  Leicestershire
26-Jul-2020 22:23 Message #4787814
at xmas i had a shock when the doctor weighed me...75kg, i had never been that light and imo not good for a broad six footer.
it was after seeing a photo when i was topping out at 93kg that i determined to loose weight, and as i was already exercising regularly i just ate more carefully mon-fri, and as a little treat i could eat anything i wanted at the w/ends.
apart from a little hungry feeling for the first week it was easy going.

18kg loss...18 bags of sugar i was no longer carrying around.

so apart from boris,s lifestyle [the dinners/functions] he has to attend, i dont see why he couldnt get under 30 bmi... or any other healthy person over 50+, its not asking a lot as its still considered over weight.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
27-Jul-2020 11:04 Message #4787831
I question the BMI thing, I think a lot of it depends on other things than being fat, my bmi hasn't been the same since I had major abdominal surgery and everything got squished up, rucked up and scarred. Why do they not take into account muscle mass, muscle weighs more than fat, I have quite good musculature especially in my legs. I saw a plastic surgeon about having my scar tissue removed and he snootily wanted me to lose lots of weight, the last time I was the weight he calculated that I should be, I was medically underweight and borderline anorexic, how can that be healthy?

I think there needs to be a lot more than banning junk food ads, teaching people to shop and cook would be a good start, changing VAT so as things like tortilla chips are VAT-able. Changing planing laws so that builders can't build houses and flats with next to no kitchen space, I've seen family houses where theres barely room to make tea and toast let alone prepare a meal.
Female
Molly  Female  Essex
27-Jul-2020 13:19 Message #4787833
BMI helps those who prefer to have targets and indicators and it can be used in most cases as a guideline.

Boris is doing a good thing and I hope it helps others but especially children who do not need to be bombarded with advertisements for unhealthy Foods and sweets.

The best indicators are your eyes as you look in the mirror and see you are getting fat and the waist of your clothes when they are no longer a loose fit.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
27-Jul-2020 14:11 Message #4787834
Hen - Agree that BMI per se can be seen as a somewhat crude measure of obesity or otherwise - but for the vast majority of the population who are not fit athletes with lots of dense muscle and very little (less dense) body fat percentage it does suffice as a decent starting point - and will be ignored by eg Olympic weight lifters and the like.

Excess fat can and often does infiltrate in and around major organs with potentially fatal consequences - aside from tending to raise BP and make hyperlipidaemia and DM more likely (though there are plenty of slim diabetics.

Each excess stone of weight needs around 14 miles of additional capillary blood vessels to nourish the excess tissue hence the heart and lungs need to work overtime as it were and the frequent finding of hypertension in overweight people. Anyone with a combo of hypertension/hyperlipidaemia has a multiplicative risk of vascular events - rather than just additive risks - as plaques of atheroma are more likely to stick to arterial walls with higher the BP - and once you have even a thin layer of atheroma that means the walls are rougher which can both make for turbulent/less efficient haemodynamics as well as accelerating the laying down of further plaques of atheroma. A narrowed artery leads to a venturi effect with raised pressure created hence a vicious circle. Over time hypertension can also damage the various valves in the circulatory system which makes for less efficiency and another vicious circle. Valves can either block partially (stenosis) or leak when they should be closed (incompetence)

Hence both the latter conditions are known as "silent killers" as typically until there is a 75% arterial blockage there may well be no symptoms presenting unless under very extreme physical stress - eg obese person suddenly runs to catch a bus in sub zero conditions and has an attack of angina.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
27-Jul-2020 14:45 Message #4787837
To put my last comment in to perspective - in UK nowadays over 91% of people survive to age 60 in stark contrast to the mere 37% in 1948.

Today's 60 plus cohort can now expect on average to survive to around age 80 (give or take 1/2 yrs either way) though there are differences both regionally as well as by economic groups - with broadly the poorer groups living shorter lives - and most acutely we see that in the street homeless where average survival is just 43/47 for females/males respectively.

As always there are the outliers at both extremes of the age spectrum - and UK has a round 1700 daily deaths (all causes) of whom around 20% are below age 60. UK has around 12 million pensioners and we see that group reduced to 3.7 million for the over 75s and to around 1.5 million for the over 85s.

ONS say that in 2018 there were 13170 centenarians - a 5% decrease from 2017 - the decrease being due to low birth numbers during WW1.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
28-Jul-2020 12:27 Message #4787912
"so apart from boris,s lifestyle [the dinners/functions] he has to attend, i dont see why he couldnt get under 30 bmi... or any other healthy person over 50+, its not asking a lot as its still considered over weight."

Boris is 5 feet 9.5 inches tall per media and weighs formerly 17 stone so his BMI was 34.5.

To get to a BMI of 30 he would need to be max 14st 11 lbs - and to get to more desirable BMI of 25 would need to be max 12st 4 pounds which is very unlikely to be achieved.

There is also some equivocation in medical circles about being too low a weight in middle age as one's immunity largely resides in the gut.
Male
brisinger  Male  Lancashire
28-Jul-2020 13:35 Message #4787913
Some of us are naturally slim and get as much flak as obese people but in a more underhand way.
Female
Victoriana11  Female  Buckinghamshire
28-Jul-2020 13:54 Message #4787914
Trouble is, nowadays so many young families cant be bothered to cook. They just pick up the phone and order a take-away. Or pop along to Kentucky FC for a bucketful of somat. So their children grow up thinking its normal. They need to have this looked at in the school curriculum. At school, the children are being made aware of the Global warming situation & all Greta's Thunbergs preaching. They take it in too, so why not re-educate them about food as well. The parents are not going to do it - this generation of parents are quite lazy, and so many dont even bother to get jobs (I am not saying all) but I am aware of quite a few who happily will stay on benefits because just so easy for them, and certainly easier than getting a job.

Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
28-Jul-2020 19:04 Message #4787925
Vic I agree with you about take aways being to easy, but so are ready meals and to few people seem to know how to cook. I think where there have been lessons in schools about growing your own food, healthy eating, sustainability etc, the children do want to eat better and encourage the parents to do so. I think its a bit unfair to describe most parents as merely lazy, I wouldn't want to have to work full time, then come home to all the usual after school stuff, housework, shopping and then cooking too, I think many are simply to busy and anything to make life easier is welcome. I do think that some people make healthier choices for quick food than others, but then thats often expensive too. I hope the government aim of getting food manufacturers to rethink their recipes in the same way that fizzy drinks have been reformulated to contain less sugar works.

With the current covid related rise in unemployment there will be a lot more people wondering how to feed themselves and their families. I remember seeing a program with some top chefs, I think Richard Corrigan and Angela Hartnet trying to feed a family on benefit money and they struggled. They showed it was possible, just and as long as there were plenty of shops that sold ingredients rather than prepacks, to many areas that are less well off have poor access to healthy food, if all I had were my local spar and costcutters I would be doing very badly, the fresh stuff they have is expensive and often past its best and the rest is prepacks of mostly junk food. I had a look round to see if I could find one meal that I could eat and I couldn't, all the veggie stuff was rubbish, fat and salt laden 4 cheese pizza pretty much sums it up, if I was lucky the might have some limp lettuce and cucumber and tomatoes best used as cannon balls.
Male
brisinger  Male  Lancashire
28-Jul-2020 19:34 Message #4787926
I don't think it's just about how to cook but how much to cook and when. One can make one's life so much easier to batch cook a lot of things and freeze them so that when you are coming how from work you can take it out of the freezer and add what's necessary to do extra. Prime examples are curries and pasta dishes. You can make life much easier for yourself defrosting things and just boiling rice or pasta on the day.
Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex
28-Jul-2020 20:05 Message #4787930
I think Boris should concentrate on Covid19. This is such a shot out of a nowhere blue when we are still in a crisis that is not visibly decreasing as it should. Precautions to decrease the spread. Not being thin when you catch it.

Cycle lanes is his latest fad. London for one is quite congested as it is. Who wants to cycle and inhale all those toxic fumes. Being invisible to some large vehicles. Why not make law that cyclists observe the rules that other road users do, a red light's a red light.
Male
Maglorian  Male  North Yorkshire
28-Jul-2020 20:32 Message #4787931
The second wave is still to come. Ninety seven people died today, on the tail end of the first wave. This weight blame is devious propaganda by the Cummings and his ministry of deflection. Sadly some of the sheeple are eating right out of their hands and pointing the finger at life style choices. While choosing to ignore the total incompetence of this governments handling. Sadly, when the second wave arrives, they will blame Spain and large people to keep us all looking inward and anal.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire
28-Jul-2020 21:29 Message #4787932
Vic I agree with you about take aways being to easy, but so are ready meals and to few people seem to know how to cook. I think where there have been lessons in schools about growing your own food, healthy eating, sustainability etc, the children do want to eat better and encourage the parents to do so. I think its a bit unfair to describe most parents as merely lazy, I wouldn't want to have to work full time, then come home to all the usual after school stuff, housework, shopping and then cooking too, I think many are simply to busy and anything to make life easier is welcome. I do think that some people make healthier choices for quick food than others, but then thats often expensive too. I hope the government aim of getting food manufacturers to rethink their recipes in the same way that fizzy drinks have been reformulated to contain less sugar works.

With the current covid related rise in unemployment there will be a lot more people wondering how to feed themselves and their families. I remember seeing a program with some top chefs, I think Richard Corrigan and Angela Hartnet trying to feed a family on benefit money and they struggled. They showed it was possible, just and as long as there were plenty of shops that sold ingredients rather than prepacks, to many areas that are less well off have poor access to healthy food, if all I had were my local spar and costcutters I would be doing very badly, the fresh stuff they have is expensive and often past its best and the rest is prepacks of mostly junk food. I had a look round to see if I could find one meal that I could eat and I couldn't, all the veggie stuff was rubbish, fat and salt laden 4 cheese pizza pretty much sums it up, if I was lucky the might have some limp lettuce and cucumber and tomatoes best used as cannon balls.


Good post wonderoushen.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire
28-Jul-2020 21:29 Message #4787933
Vic I agree with you about take aways being to easy, but so are ready meals and to few people seem to know how to cook. I think where there have been lessons in schools about growing your own food, healthy eating, sustainability etc, the children do want to eat better and encourage the parents to do so. I think its a bit unfair to describe most parents as merely lazy, I wouldn't want to have to work full time, then come home to all the usual after school stuff, housework, shopping and then cooking too, I think many are simply to busy and anything to make life easier is welcome. I do think that some people make healthier choices for quick food than others, but then thats often expensive too. I hope the government aim of getting food manufacturers to rethink their recipes in the same way that fizzy drinks have been reformulated to contain less sugar works.

With the current covid related rise in unemployment there will be a lot more people wondering how to feed themselves and their families. I remember seeing a program with some top chefs, I think Richard Corrigan and Angela Hartnet trying to feed a family on benefit money and they struggled. They showed it was possible, just and as long as there were plenty of shops that sold ingredients rather than prepacks, to many areas that are less well off have poor access to healthy food, if all I had were my local spar and costcutters I would be doing very badly, the fresh stuff they have is expensive and often past its best and the rest is prepacks of mostly junk food. I had a look round to see if I could find one meal that I could eat and I couldn't, all the veggie stuff was rubbish, fat and salt laden 4 cheese pizza pretty much sums it up, if I was lucky the might have some limp lettuce and cucumber and tomatoes best used as cannon balls.


Good post wonderoushen.
Female
Greencare  Female  Berkshire
28-Jul-2020 21:33 Message #4787935
I think Boris is very much on the right track. Obesity leads to such ill health and strain on our medical services it's in everyone's interest that we have healthier eating. I don't think cycle lanes are anyone's latest fad but more an inevitable priority in our cities.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
29-Jul-2020 09:15 Message #4787963
Mags

As you well know the published daily Covid death figures comprise deaths which may have occurred over several weeks in various community sectors but which take time to be collated centrally - so in essence they have been collated in past 24 hours but not happened during last 24 hours.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire
29-Jul-2020 09:22 Message #4787964
Mags ain't interested in facts he just want to make another of his inane posts to ruin another conversation.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire
29-Jul-2020 09:26 Message #4787965
Greencare Female Berkshire
28-Jul-2020 21:33 new Message #4787935
I think Boris is very much on the right track. Obesity leads to such ill health and strain on our medical services it's in everyone's interest that we have healthier eating. I don't think cycle lanes are anyone's latest fad but more an inevitable priority in our cities.


How can anyone disagree that obesity is not good for you?

During this pandemic practically every area around the country has seen not just more cyclists but more families cycling which is important for our future.
Female
RAACH84  Female  Buckinghamshire
29-Jul-2020 09:38 Message #4787966
BMI can be used as a guideline or as an incentive to lose excess weight. Incentives for cycling with more publicity and more cycle paths is an absolute necessity for a healthier nation with fresher air to breathe. I have always cycled with my kids but more so now than ever before. Boris has always been enthusiastic about cycling.

I don't know whether banning some advertising will help us eat more sensibly but the experts who study these things have always thought this is so and logically, if advertising junk food didn't sell more of it then the advertisers wouldn't waste their money.

Wearing seat belts, stopping smoking and giving cyclists a wide berth when passing them have all been helped by bans and publicity.

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