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New cycle lanes

Does your area have them

Female
eurostar  Female  Merseyside
24-Jun-2020 08:54 Message #4784611
Liverpool has put a good few cycle lanes in recently, but now have given new directive to fine any cars parked on them, now I, m a keen cyclist but even I can see that people who have no drives need to park lol what's happened in your area? What is the solution?
Male
Pboro Trevor  Male  Cambridgeshire
24-Jun-2020 09:23 Message #4784616
They are contemplating them. However a disastrous attempt to create bus lanes a few years ago was a disaster, with traffic brought to a halt throughout the city, which in turn held up the buses they were designed to help.

In London, a vast wave of cycle lanes has led to a disturbing increase in pollution, as vehicles that were doing an average speed of 23MPH are now doing an average speed of 15MPH. There has been no decrease in the volumes of traffic as the majority of vehicles are servicing the major companies that have offices in London, and all the smaller companies that support them and their staff. As we all now, the slower vehicles are the more pollution they emit.

So, introducing cycle lanes has to properly researched as they could be a double edged sword.

Trevor
Male
vanman  Male  Cambridgeshire
24-Jun-2020 09:45 Message #4784618
There is a road in Cambridge they want to close to cars, put barriers half way down it, and widen pavements etc
Its a long road, with shops all down one side for half of it, and both sides, the other half , been 2 way traffic for ever, and the shopkeepers are saying NO, it will kill the street, with delivery drivers, Taxi's ect, having to make a 3-4 mile detour to get either end,
With the easing of the rules and regulations every 2-3 weeks it seems a bit late to do it now.
Social distancing down to 1 metre, there's almost as many cars on the roads as there was before it all happened.
Not as many cyclists, out in the sticks anyway, I suppose most of them are back at work now.
And when the gym's reopen the joggers will go back there.

When it was closed completely some time ago for major sewer repairs, shops an cafe's put out stock, and seats on the pavement
I expect they would do the same if pavements are widened for 'social distancing' now.
Defeating the object really!
Extend the shop area, put out tables and chairs, let the people walk in the road! lol.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
24-Jun-2020 10:26 Message #4784624
Not that I'm aware, but then being rural rather than urban its a bit different here.
Male
terry  Male  West Yorkshire
24-Jun-2020 10:26 Message #4784625
On the bus following a cyclist yesterday, although there was a cycle lane he had his head down racing along in the vehicle lane, traffic backed up behind him because they couldn't overtake...ahh well.

My opinion on cars and parking?, get rid of cars, or change how we use them and reduce the numbers. Not likely to happen but that short period of time when there were very few around was like heaven.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
24-Jun-2020 12:10 Message #4784634
Reducing cars cannot be done in isolation - it would also need public transport to revert to the spread and frequency of the the 1940s/50s - and of course for lifestyles to change radically with fewer trips away from home other than work/school/grocery shopping etc.

In 1960 we had only around 3 million private cars in UK and today over 10 times that - so we went from one car to every 5 homes to now nearer 1.25 cars per home.
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London
24-Jun-2020 14:31 Message #4784639
I've noticed how much more pollution and slowing of traffic is caused by bus lanes especially at traffic lights where the waiting times can easily be doubled. We do need dedicated cycle ways but they would have to be at the expense of pavement space and not creating more problems on the roads.
I'm not far from Milton Keynes which being a new city had cycle ways from he start so it was designed with road routes and pleasure roads and trails.
There is also a scheme employers can sign up to which gives their employees incentives to purchase new bikes so they can cycle to work.
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London
24-Jun-2020 15:00 Message #4784644
I'm going to have a quick moan at a cyclist I encountered this morning. If I was on Facebook I know that is the correct place for a good rant but I'm not!
As I slowed on approaching a roundabout .. I was in the nearside lane of two lanes. The cyclist overtook took me on the outside lane but cut across the front of me to get into the nearside lane when leaving the roundabout. I mumbled lots of swearwords wishing my window had been open! As I approached another roundabout in the single lane for going straight on I could see him rapidly approaching from behind pedalling madly (head down squeaky lycra) and he was going at a fair pace not far off 30 mph at a guess. As I left the roundabout he undertook me on the nearside without even slowing. If I hadn't seen him coming up from behind I might have been too close to the kerb for him to pass and he would have clattered into me at 30 mph which I'm sure he would have found a bit distressing.
If I had been driving a commercial vehicle with no interior mirror I doubt if he would have been visible due to the manner he was cycling, the speed he approached and the unexpected nearside overtake. I'm sure it would still not have been his fault!!
Male
brisinger  Male  Lancashire
24-Jun-2020 17:59 Message #4784655
The ones that they have laid on Oxford road in Manchester near the University are positively dangerous. They have put a separate kerb between the cycle lane and the main road. It's a busy road and I was too busy making sure that there was no immediate oncoming traffic to look down and see it. About a year ago I was crossing Oxford Road not knowing they were there, caught one and went flying onto the main road. I could quite easily have broken my leg laid in the middle of the road. You can see them on google maps.
Male
brisinger  Male  Lancashire
24-Jun-2020 18:00 Message #4784656
Extra kerb as well as pavement on Oxford Road...
shorturl.at/iwIK8
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
24-Jun-2020 21:14 Message #4784675
They have now extended the Deansgate temporary lane south along the A56 to Timperley and taken out the entire inner lane so that will be around 7-9 miles out of Manchester.

I support improvements for cycling but along that route is 12 feet wide pavement that could become a shared route as not many pedestrians on it.
Female
NoSaint  Female  Devon
25-Jun-2020 07:55 Message #4784699
I hope serious plans are made to improve routes for bicycles and to pubic transport. The plans for electric vehicles will be a disaster. A knee jerk reaction to being told to get something done quickly.
Female
eurostar  Female  Merseyside
25-Jun-2020 08:48 Message #4784710
No saint, I so agree with you, the cycle lanes were fine when no traffic but as you say knee jerk reaction, our bus lanes got stopped a few years ago because it caused chaos
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
25-Jun-2020 09:18 Message #4784713
It may take 2 or 3 decades but the future for personal transport seems likely to move away from personal car ownership and toward a network of circulating driverless EVs which are "hailed" like an Uber cab on a smartphone - probably a mix of such vehicles for short local journeys but also connected to major hubs for the longer trips.

For most people cycling may be fine as a hobby but unless you are super fit and have a short commute it will not replace other motorised transport. Last time I checked the average UK commute was over 12 miles each way and cycling that distance in all weathers takes some dedication and I say that from first hand experience.

Female
Sea  Female  Essex
27-Jun-2020 10:11 Message #4784901
There are no cycle lanes where I live, so when out I keep to the quiet country lanes. Any very short distances of main road and I walk my bicycle, as do not want a bus or large lorry on my backside. Definitely wish there was a cycle lane I could use. Terry like you I have encountered cyclists on the road when there is a perfectly good cycle lane, which can be infuriating. One case was actually near Paphos in Cyprus. Millions has been spent on a brand new road that is mostly dual carriageway but the last, very lengthy section, as it turns a corner and leading up to a roundabout is single track but the central reservation continues, so no way to overtake etc. There is a lovely equally brand new, smooth straight, level cycle track alongside this road. Plenty of signs to inform you. I was a passenger in a car one day, behind a very long queue of very slow moving traffic. At the front of this queue was a bus with a cyclist in front of him. Yet just the other side of the thick kerb was this lovely cycle track. If I had been the bus driver I think I would have hooted like mad and pointed across to the idiot, to move onto the cycle track. Just plain selfish. But why would you prefer to have a bus and a huge line of traffic right behind you, rather than cycle on a lovely empty cycle track? Think there should be heavy fines in place, whichever country you may be in, if you cycle on the road when a perfectly good cycle track is provided. I also believe that it may make those in charge of budgets putting in cycle lanes, less inclined, if nobody actually uses them.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
27-Jun-2020 11:09 Message #4784908
In UK that is all exacerbated by the newish rule that says motorists must leave around a 5 feet gap when passing a cyclist on the road - so a 2 lane road needs to be around 32 feet wide to allow a bus to overtake a cyclist who is a yard from the kerb (without the bus needing to cross over to oncoming traffic lane).
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London
27-Jun-2020 11:37 Message #4784909
It would save the lives of far more cyclists if the rule stated that cyclists must leave a 5 feet gap when passing a motor vehicle. This would prevent all the very dangerous and often moronic near side passing which results in many deaths and injuries.
Male
Colonel_Blink  Male  Buckinghamshire
27-Jun-2020 17:54 Message #4784934
png. That is wishful thinking. When cyclists undertake all caution and common sense disappears.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
27-Jun-2020 21:32 Message #4784948
Well, Trafford has had to remove one of the temp cycle routes that blocked of a half the south out of Manchester section because of complaints from drivers. It is reasonable because they probably had not realised commuters are being asked to use their cars instead of public transport right now, and not everyone can or wants to cycle 10-12 miles each way into the City.
Female
eurostar  Female  Merseyside
27-Jun-2020 21:36 Message #4784950
Lyn I can see that happening here, soon lol
Female
Minnie-the-Minx  Female  Hertfordshire
28-Jun-2020 16:41 Message #4785043
Drivers are supposed to leave a 5ft gap tp overtake a cyclist, but that doesn't prevent moronic off side overtaking from car drivers. Before now, I've been passed so close by cars that my toes strap has rattled against their bumper. That means it was less than 5 inches, not feet.
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London
28-Jun-2020 16:52 Message #4785044
I couldn't agree with you more Minnie. I have noticed that many motorists have improved and are leaving more room than in the past. It does mean a queue waiting to get past but why is everyone in such a hurry? There is no excuse for speeding past a cyclists and not even considering possible consequences.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
28-Jun-2020 17:12 Message #4785047
As a result of general congestion as well as all the modern traffic calming measures - London traffic average speed is now down to around the same as 1900 when the horse and cart was the main transport travelling at average 10 mph - so a degree of frustration is inevitable on the part of motorists.
Female
JustLyn  Female  Cheshire
28-Jun-2020 17:49 Message #4785050
png

I have been called a liar on a cycling forum because I am a bit of a devil's advocate and don't like ganging up against one side or another. I agree with you in a way, but I have been stuck behind a team of cyclists for around 30 mins on a long country lane heading towards Norfolk cross country. I know if I'm cycling, I pull in on a wide bit so drivers can pass.

There's a divide in cycling now, between the Strava racing speeders and the more Netherlands style ordinary clothed amblers, and the speeders have a mentality of all cars are in their way and should be off the road and some take delight in goading and then using the argument how the driver is always at fault, even though they race through traffic lights on red.

As for being in a hurry, well yes, life is at a fast pace even if the cyclists doesn't have a concept that something might be going on where the driver does have a schedule to meet. It is well known how bad delivery drivers have to do 100 drops a day or lose pay, and more and more people are expecting deliveries on time, tradesmen losing work if not on time.

I was once arguing with my ex as we sped at dangerous speeds to get our daughter to hospital as she wasn't breathing and calling an ambulance and risking waiting too long didn't feel an option.

Then there was a woman who was in labour, and Quick Fit in Stockport delivered the baby.

I think if there is ever anyone frantic trying to get past, it's best to give them the benefit of the doubt.
Male
MrQuiet  Male  Northamptonshire
28-Jun-2020 22:54 Message #4785083
Most cyclists are considerate and also appreciate how vulnerable they are but just as in politics we have the minority of extremists who think they own the roads, make their own rules and are invulnerable.


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