Conversation Society, News and Sport
Helper icon Helpers: Chris2mates , LLstill , PrincessFruitBat


About us

Midsummer's Eve is a free online dating community - based around friendship, real meetups, real people, and real relationships. We've been online since 1999 and have twice won Radio 2's Web Site of the Day award. So why not join us for free and join in the discussion?

e-scooters

Would you use one?

1 2 Next   Last  

Male
tumbled  Male  Gloucestershire
22-Jun-2020 15:37 Message #4784448
I was watching a video on youtube from the good old USA....and e-scooters are legal in some states....maybe all states...I haven't checked them all.....

They have become a bit like Boris bikes I think....Where you hire one and leave it after use....something like that anyway...

They aren't like the scooters that people ride....like mods used to for instance....They are like kids scooters....but motorised and adultised....and some go quite fast....

I think they are currently illegal over here...but I've just read something about them trying to get them legal.....

The initial video I watched was a bit of a 'history in the making' video.....A woman in her twenties was charged with riding one under the influence of alcohol.....It was in Albuquerque...The first arrest for riding one over the limit...She tested as .2 on the monitor...over twice the legal limit.....The girl became a bit abusive during her arrest...She wouldn't shut up....which probably worsened things.......

Anyway....if they became legal over here....would you use one......sober of course......

They do seem a bit dangerous at the best of times.....

Are they just for the youngsters?......
Male
tumbled  Male  Gloucestershire
22-Jun-2020 15:45 Message #4784450
I think currently in the UK, you can ride them on private land....but not on public land....

I don't know all the rules.....I've only just started researching them.....
Male
tumbled  Male  Gloucestershire
22-Jun-2020 16:15 Message #4784452
From the Guardian.....

Rented e-scooters ride to the rescue of English commuters as Covid lockdown eases
Councils in 30 cities plan pilot projects to relieve public transport overcrowding

Rented motorised scooters could soon be ubiquitous in many English cities as councils prepare pilot projects aimed at relieving pressure on public transport caused by the coronavirus.

The Department for Transport is expected to publish its framework for e-scooters next week, which will give details of how the system of rented scooters will work. Privately owned scooters will still be banned.

The framework was originally due to be published tomorrow but has been delayed while issues around who will be eligible to ride the scooters is resolved.

The UK is years behind many other European countries in an initiative that is credited with cutting the number of car journeys. In Finland, 41% of respondents to a survey said they had replaced taxi rides or private cars with e-scooters and almost one in five Finns said they had used them for business trips.

However, other European cities have suffered from allowing too many scooter rental companies to compete with as many as 10 being given licences, leading to banks of scooters strewn across pavements blocking pedestrians. Many cities in the US have experienced “scooter rage” with residents throwing the machines into rivers because there are so many of them weaving along pavements.


The Albuquerque incident is from last year....just after they introduced them.....

Get ready for Scooter rage.....
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
22-Jun-2020 17:16 Message #4784457
Another nonsense if it's legal to ride a rented E-scooter in public places but not one you own - and using would I assume remain illegal on pavements whilst being dangerous for users if on the road.

I don't know what range they have but I doubt it will be of much use for many commuters - a moped would make more sense for the group who are fit and do not mind being out in all weathers.
Female
Andromeda  Female  Berkshire
22-Jun-2020 18:29 Message #4784460
I think not.
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London
22-Jun-2020 21:54 Message #4784480
I'd use one now for getting round a city but the laws need to change so they can be used on either the paths or roads legally. Are e-bike laws clear? I think you can use them under normal bike regulations.
When I was working in Italy we often travelled around on Segways which were great fun. We used them on paths and roads and they were either allowed or the police turned a blind eye because nobody ever complained.
Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex
22-Jun-2020 22:02 Message #4784483
They are currently illegal to use here anywhere other than on private land a bit like the hoverboard from a few years ago but that craze quickly fizzled out pretty quickly when people realised they couldn't be used legally.
But these e-scooters are a bit different and the law hasn't stopped people taking advantage of quiet roads and footway's during lockdown and using them.
There was talk during lockdown of pushing through a law change to make their use legal.
You can see why, if they can be used to ride around locally or to commute on to reduce the pressure on public transport.
They're pretty nippy, max 15mph but their use really needs to be regulated, or they're going to result in lots of injuries to users and pedestrians.
Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex
22-Jun-2020 22:25 Message #4784488
They are currently illegal to use here anywhere other than on private land a bit like the hoverboard from a few years ago but that craze quickly fizzled out pretty quickly when people realised they couldn't be used legally.
But these e-scooters are a bit different and the law hasn't stopped people taking advantage of quiet roads and footway's during lockdown and using them.
There was talk during lockdown of pushing through a law change to make their use legal.
You can see why, if they can be used to ride around locally or to commute on to reduce the pressure on public transport.
They're pretty nippy, max 15mph but their use really needs to be regulated, or they're going to result in lots of injuries to users and pedestrians.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
23-Jun-2020 07:50 Message #4784512
I can just imagine an elderly pensioner getting knocked over on the pavement by illegal use of an e-scooter and ending up with a hip fracture and then maybe dying as a result - then there would be a similar court case as we had with the London cyclist riding a fixie a couple of years back who hit a woman who walked out in front of him while looking at her mobile phone - she died soon after from a head injury sustained when he hit her and he was found guilty of riding wantonly and furiously under an 1861 law - main issue being around lack of front wheel brake (it was a track bike which is illegal to use on public roads).

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-41028321
Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex
23-Jun-2020 10:49 Message #4784529
Well the Act making it illegal to cycle on the footway (meant for pedestrians) is older than that
1835 (although then amended in 1888) .
Obviously this was in a time when cycles were not like today's and roads were not full or motorised vehicles. It is way too dangerous to cycle on many roads around me, and I rarely go by bike unless there's a circuitous route using quieter side roads (but even then I've nearly been knocked off by unattentive drivers or those speeding using the side roads as a rat-run).
So it's about time that a complete overhaul of the laws relating to shared use of footways for pedestrians & cycles and other forms of mechanical vehicle like e-scooters/skateboards etc is carried out.
Where the footway is wide enough to allow it I cannot see why a separate lane cannot be marked for the safe use by both.
BUT they should also make it mandatory for any users to wear helmets, a high-viz, and have a bell of some sort and lights so that pedestrians and motorists can see them.
And there should be enforcement for anyone not complying.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
23-Jun-2020 11:42 Message #4784533
I wouldn't ride one as I don't think I'd have the balance, not that I think its really practicle round here. I would worry about pedestrians being further crowded out, its no fun walking when you're trying to avoid cyclists, mobility scooters, skate boarders, roller skaters and now seemingly these new e-scooters. I agree that seperate lanes are needed for them and other human and electric powered small transports as are some kind of helmets, lights and high viz, most of all enforcement of these rules are needed, to often people think traffic rules don't apply to them and yet if I were to hit one with my car it would automatically be my fault. I'd also like to see some sort of third party insurance for these vehicles, it might serve to make the drivers/users more aware of the costs to others of their lack of consideration or stupidity if their insurance premiums went up to cover the cost of someones broken hip, whether its an elderly person who ends up in a care home, or a younger person who ends up having time off work.
Female
Topaz53  Female  Northamptonshire
23-Jun-2020 18:13 Message #4784564
No way... have a problem maintaining balance on my feet !
Male
vintagedave  Male  Northamptonshire
24-Jun-2020 19:25 Message #4784663
Hello all,

e-scooters are illegal in the UK because they have no braking system. Bear in mind that some are capable of 30mph., and it becomes obvious why there is no rush to legalise them.
There are a lot of implications involved, and a complete change in Construction & Use regulations would be required to legalise.
Male
vintagedave  Male  Northamptonshire
24-Jun-2020 19:25 Message #4784664
Hello all,

e-scooters are illegal in the UK because they have no braking system. Bear in mind that some are capable of 30mph., and it becomes obvious why there is no rush to legalise them.
There are a lot of implications involved, and a complete change in Construction & Use regulations would be required to legalise.

Male
vintagedave  Male  Northamptonshire
24-Jun-2020 19:32 Message #4784665
Hello all,
There are a couple of reasons why e-scooters are currently illegal to use in a public space or on public roads. The main reason is that they have no braking system which contravenes Construction & Use regulations. A secondary issue is the lack of suspension, and Construction & Use limits vehicles in this category to 40kph (26mph). Now bear in mind that many of these scooters can reach 30 mph, and you can see why there is a reluctance to change the law.

David
Female
NoSaint  Female  Devon
25-Jun-2020 07:57 Message #4784701
Brakes and suspension are easily modified.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
25-Jun-2020 10:05 Message #4784718
By the time you add brakes/suspension and say a seat for comfort - and lights for safety at night you basically have a moped needing Tax/Ins etc and of course being illegal to use on pavements as are bicycles etc.
Male
vintagedave  Male  Northamptonshire
26-Jun-2020 19:49 Message #4784867
Nosaint,

Brakes could be fitted, but it would not be simple job. It would be impossible to fit suspension unless that was designed as part of the original vehicle. These would probably double the cost !

David
Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex
30-Jun-2020 09:56 Message #4785199
Just heard on the radio that "e-scooters" are about to be made legal to use on the road (previously they were illegal to use on road under the 1988 Road Traffic Act) and the wearing of helmets, when using one, will not be compulsory. Even though they're speed limited to 25kph (15.5 mph) I think I'd still wear one especially with the condition of many road surfaces.
They will still be illegal to use of the footway (pavement) as are bicycles under the 1835 Highways Act.

I've seen so many flouting the law and using them during lock-down so I can see their popularity exploding, but I can also see problems on the horizon if people are not sensible (oh no not relying on that again!!) when and how they use them.

E-scooter versus pedestrian is not going to end up well for the latter.
Female
eurostar  Female  Merseyside
30-Jun-2020 10:11 Message #4785203
No chance lol have you seen the amount of pot holes round here recently lol ooer
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
1-Jul-2020 10:42 Message #4785309
From what I saw you will only be able to use rented scooters legally and not one you already own, what kind of bat sh1t craziness is that?
Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex
1-Jul-2020 12:48 Message #4785334
I've just heard that, in fact they're discussing it on the Jeremy Vine show on Radio 2 now, and also the rental bikes too.

That wasn't mentioned in the article I read about the decision to make them "road" legal.
That's ridiculous.
Yes it might make sense in large City centres to help commuters get around from say train or bus termini but will be absolutely no use in the outer areas as you're not going to have racks of these scooters everywhere.
Most of the rental bike schemes that sprung up (when the Boris Bikes were launched in central London) went down the pan as not enough people were interested and I remember seeing pictures of hundreds of dumped bicycles being scrapped where the rental company had gone belly up.
Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex
1-Jul-2020 12:56 Message #4785335
The report confirms

The vehicles are banned on pavements, will be limited to 15.5mph and it is recommended that riders wear helmets.
Privately owned e-scooters remain illegal on roads.
Under the new rules set out by the DfT, local authorities and devolved administrations in England, Scotland and Wales can allow or run e-scooter sharing schemes in their areas as part of 12-month trials.
Riders will need a full or provisional car, motorcycle or moped licence to use the vehicles, and they must be aged 16 or over.
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd
2-Jul-2020 10:09 Message #4785399
Thats another thing I don't get, the need for a some kind of driving licence, you don't need one for mobility scooters, skate boards, bicycles and roller skates, whats so special about these scooters?
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey
2-Jul-2020 10:25 Message #4785402
Obtaining a Provisional Driving Licence is contingent on being able to read a number plate from 20 metres away - and also ensure you use suitable corrective lenses where needed every time you use a vehicle other than a bicycle on the road.

There are also ID checks in place when applying for the driving licence and this limited approval for e-scooter use on public roads is part of a 12 month trial.

I can envisage potholed roads being an issue as the speed limit of 15.5 mph still equates to 22.75 feet per second and the tine wheel in even a modest pothole could send the rider in to the path of a moving vehicle so users will need good road sense to survive.

1 2 Next   Last  


 Back to top

 Help with conversations