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Dept for Transport - MOT expiry extension

Just received this announcement from my cars main dealership

Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex 25-Mar-2020 13:51 Message #4773685
NEW RULES ON MOT TESTING
To further help prevent the spread of coronavirus, The Department for Transport
have announced that any cars and vans due for an MOT from 30th March 2020
will have their MOT extended by 6 months.

You do not need to do anything to extend your vehicle’s MOT expiry date if it’s on
or after 30 March 2020. However, vehicles must be kept in a roadworthy condition and drivers can be prosecuted if they drive an unsafe vehicle.

Your vehicle will be automatically given a 6-month MOT exemption.
This will extend your current MOT expiry date by 6 months.

Example: Your vehicle’s MOT was due to expire on 3 April 2020.

This will automatically be extended to 3 October 2020.
You will need to get your MOT by this date.

This will allow vehicle owners to continue to be able to get to work where
this absolutely cannot be done from home or do essential shopping.

If your vehicle tax is due, you can tax your vehicle as soon as your
MOT due date has been updated.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 25-Mar-2020 14:12 Message #4773689
Good news for me as it pushes the expense into the new year...
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey 25-Mar-2020 15:22 Message #4773691
Just make sure to check tyre tread wear (TWIs) and lights and screenwash fluid - also have a squint through wheel spokes at esp front disc pad wear unless recently renewed.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 25-Mar-2020 15:47 Message #4773703
I don't think 6 months will make much difference in that respect and you should be checking those things as a matter of course anyway.
I just hope my aged exhaust hangs on for a few more months, I was bracing myself for a £400 bill for a new one to get it through the MOT...
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey 25-Mar-2020 15:57 Message #4773704
You can repair an aged exhaust with bits of tin can clamped to pipes/silencer with copious amounts of exhaust fitting paste which hardens when hot.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 25-Mar-2020 16:05 Message #4773705
To be honest I'm at an age now where I no longer relish laying under a car, I've already adopted make do and mend by getting it through the last MOT with the help of some jubilee clips.
The exhaust is the original one from new and the car is 12 years old so it really doesn't owe me anything....
Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex 26-Mar-2020 12:24 Message #4773766
Six months MOT extension. Road tax without any MOT. So insurance can still be renewed (without MOT). I guess that means garages will not be carrying out a service. I hope they're still open, I'd have thought essential service.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey 26-Mar-2020 14:01 Message #4773777
Motorists remain obliged to ensure a car is roadworthy - as flagged with the recent nil MOT for classic cars registered over 40 plus years ago.

There is a potential fine of £2500 to ensure compliance though in practice that would probably need a serious lack of roadworthiness - rather than the odd bulb not working.

Every motorist should be capable of checking their tyres - eg use the tread wear indicators to ensure there remains the mandatory min 1.6 mm of tread on each tyre - as well as ensuring they are correctly inflated.

The TWIs are little raised ridges set horizontally across tyres at 3 regular spacings - and if the tyre tread is at or below that level the tyre is illegal to use.
Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex 26-Mar-2020 14:08 Message #4773778
You mean bald tyres? Well that's handy to know in case the garage tries to fob you off into buying new tyres.

No idea what roadworthy is. Spark plugs they always change, oil, some other stuff. I don't think I'm going to be doing that. I don't suppose (3 months in my case) will make a difference.

Quite pleased though that it now staggers the road tax, ins. Mot, service. Which I used to have to pay all at the same time.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey 26-Mar-2020 14:22 Message #4773779
Whilst the legal min is 1.6 mm of tyre tread across the tyre all round - it is highly recommended not to go below 2 mm of tread to ensure safety in wet/emergency braking etc - hence garages now often flag the actual tread residue to car owners at service/MOT time.

If your car is getting close to being around say 10 yrs old corrosion may begin to affect the structural integrity of the monocoque chassis and if such corrosion is close to suspension mountings etc that can be an MOT failure - hence worth perusing your last MOT for any Advisories - items which were borderline but not serious enough to fail the MOT.

If you have lost the last MOT printout - just Google "check MOT" and select the Gov site and enter your car registration number and it will show several years worth of MOT history including any Advisory items.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 26-Mar-2020 14:35 Message #4773780
"No idea what roadworthy is."

You drive a car and have no idea what roadworthy is, thanks for my laugh of the day.... lol
Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex 26-Mar-2020 14:45 Message #4773781
I leave that to the mechanics Hierophant. Or those that have to fix their own cars.
Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex 26-Mar-2020 14:48 Message #4773782
Boydel

Whilst the legal min is 1.6 mm of tyre tread across the tyre all round - it is highly recommended not to go below 2 mm of tread to ensure safety in wet/emergency braking etc - hence garages now often flag the actual tread residue to car owners at service/MOT time.

If your car is getting close to being around say 10 yrs old corrosion may begin to affect the structural integrity of the monocoque chassis and if such corrosion is close to suspension mountings etc that can be an MOT failure - hence worth perusing your last MOT for any Advisories - items which were borderline but not serious enough to fail the MOT.

If you have lost the last MOT printout - just Google "check MOT" and select the Gov site and enter your car registration number and it will show several years worth of MOT history including any Advisory items

…………………………………….

oh ok. I usually take it to the dealership where I bought it. They usually say if anything is border line, though I can't remember what they said from last year.

Its around the 10 year mark but I didn't drive it for 2 years plus. Apart from the electric windows that got stuck in the winter, seem to be ok now. New battery. It's Volkswagen, Polo, wouldn't mind a new car, but you don't know what to buy these days. Polo's nippy in traffic and small to park.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 26-Mar-2020 14:49 Message #4773783
You know every time you drive a car it's your responsibility to make sure it's roadworthy?...

Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex 26-Mar-2020 14:51 Message #4773784
If ou're looking for an argument Hierophant, you'll have to find someone else to oblige.
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 26-Mar-2020 14:57 Message #4773785
I'm not, I was just surprised you said what you did....
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey 26-Mar-2020 15:26 Message #4773788
Gilpin

It is also worth flagging the distinction between a car Service (items attended to are listed by age/mileage in Owners Manual) and the MOT per se which unlike a Service does check whole car for safety related issues.

With many cars there is no common date for Service/MOT so it is unwise for example to rely on a recent Service as being evidence of roadworthiness - though one would hope that a decent garage would have the integrity to at least give a vehicle a "quick once over" for general safety before handing back to a customer.

The technicians in a major Main Dealer Service Dept will usually be on a bonus for the number of cars serviced per day - and that is not always conducive to attending to any more than the specified jobs on the job sheet.

Even via handwashing your own car you can often spot things which may be amiss - eg a poorly inflated tyre which may otherwise go unnoticed.

That is the kind of thing where the home mechanic who may spread service items over a few days or weeks may have the advantage over an owner who puts the car in for say an annual Service - and esp so over the owner who ignores the age related aspect to a Service and if they only do a low mileage may delay a Service for far longer - whilst relying on the mandatory annual MOT for a safety check.
Male
vanman  Male  Cambridgeshire 26-Mar-2020 17:08 Message #4773792
It's NOT a free for all extra 6 months MOT!

It depends how long the ruling is in place, and when your MOT is due.

For instance ... If the ruling ENDS on 30th September and your MOT is DUE !st October, you DON'T get an extra 6 months! You HAVE to have it MOT'd on 1st October.

It's ONLY if your MOT expires while the ruling is in place!
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 26-Mar-2020 18:22 Message #4773801
This is what the government website says...

From 30 March 2020, MOT due dates for cars, motorcycles and light vans will be extended by 6 months. This is being done to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

What you need to do
You do not need to do anything to extend your vehicle’s MOT expiry date if it’s on or after 30 March 2020. However, you must keep your vehicle safe to drive.

Your vehicle will be automatically given a 6-month MOT exemption. This will extend your current MOT expiry date by 6 months.

Example
Your vehicle’s MOT was due to expire on 3 April 2020.

This will automatically be extended to 3 October 2020. You will need to get your MOT by this date.

You can check your MOT history to see when you have been issued an exemption. It will not be updated straight away, so keep checking back if your new due date MOT is not yet showing.

You will not get a paper exemption certificate.

If your vehicle tax is due, you can tax your vehicle as soon as your MOT due date has been updated.

If your vehicle’s first MOT is due
Your vehicle will be automatically given a 6-month MOT exemption from the date its first MOT was due.

If your first MOT was due before 30 March 2020 and your vehicle did not pass
Your vehicle will not get an extension to its MOT due date.

Your vehicle will need to pass an MOT before you can drive it again.

The government is allowing MOT centres and garages to remain open. So you can still get an MOT if you need your vehicle:

to shop for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
for any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
to travel to and from work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home....
Male
Hierophant  Male  East Anglia 26-Mar-2020 18:35 Message #4773802
So it is an automatic 6 month extension if your MOT is due on or after 30 March 2020....
Female
Gilpin  Female  Middlesex 26-Mar-2020 20:50 Message #4773828
Thanks Boydel, that's very informative.

I go to Citygate, they wash and valet, inc. with any service, I been with them for years, I've never had a prob. and the car 'feels' smoother/better. I haven't washed my car since I was 20 odd. Well that's not quite true, I'm just too lazy now. Rather read a book and have someone else do it!
Male
Seasons-Greetings  Male  Essex 29-Mar-2020 13:27 Message #4774172
Yes it is H.
So in fact what I put when posting the thread.

The DoT have advised that -
Legislation will be introduced on 30 March 2020 and will come into immediate effect for 12 months.

"All cars, vans and motorcycles which usually would require an MOT test will be exempted from needing a test from 30 March 2020. Vehicles must be kept in a roadworthy condition, and garages will remain open for essential repair work. Drivers can be prosecuted if driving unsafe vehicles"

Over the winter months I have never seen so many vehicles driving around with one headlight out and/or sometimes no sidelight either, not to mention faulty back lights, brake lights, number plate lights.
Any of these would be MOT failures and it concerns me that if people can't even to be bothered to get them fixed (& I appreciate that in many modern cars it isn't easy to do yourself) how are they going to bother about tyres nearing their limit and other consumables like brake pads/discs which cost potentially hundreds of pounds more.
Male
BOYDEL  Male  Surrey 29-Mar-2020 13:40 Message #4774173
Yes lights and tyres are the main causes for MOT failures.


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