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Deep Geothermal Energy

Male
A_man_called_CHIOG  Male  South East London 26-Aug-2019 11:10 Message #4749670
I’m not sure how it works but I think flooding abandoned deep mines with water which the earth heats up and this provides power. It does work but is it feasible to provide the masses of energy needed?
Male
persona_non_grata  Male  North London 26-Aug-2019 14:04 Message #4749693
I hope someone adds to this. It sounds very interesting.
Female
NoSaint  Female  Devon 26-Aug-2019 15:03 Message #4749696
They have something like that in Southampton.
Male
NotHermit  Male  Derbyshire 26-Aug-2019 18:07 Message #4749710
Some coal mines were very hot, but some were very cold.
Also the roadways would collapse in time, so no water circuit.
They do recover methane from some old coal mines.
Female
NoSaint  Female  Devon 26-Aug-2019 22:22 Message #4749724
Still going strong.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SouthamptonDistrictEnergy_Scheme.
Female
NoSaint  Female  Devon 26-Aug-2019 22:41 Message #4749727
I hope I’m allowed to post a link.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 27-Aug-2019 06:41 Message #4749738
Googled.

The centre of Southampton is located above a large hot water aquifer that provides geothermal power to some of the city's buildings. This energy is processed at a plant in the West Quay region in Southampton city centre, the only geothermal power station in the UK. The plant provides private electricity for the Port of Southampton and hot water to the Southampton District Energy Scheme used by many buildings including the Westquay shopping centre. In a 2006 survey of carbon emissions in major UK cities conducted by British Gas, Southampton was ranked as being one of the lowest carbon-emitting cities in the United Kingdom.
Male
Neros1954  Male  Devon 27-Aug-2019 08:09 Message #4749742
This should certainly be up there with wind farms and solar panels. Towns looking after their own environment is important too.
Male
Templar2013  Male  South East London 27-Aug-2019 14:50 Message #4749772
Neros1954 Male Devon 27-Aug-2019 08:09 new Message #4749742
This should certainly be up there with wind farms and solar panels. Towns looking after their own environment is important too.


Yes you would think so. We need to be looking at feasible alternative power sources.
Male
tsunamiwarrior  Male  Hertfordshire 28-Aug-2019 07:06 Message #4749841
Geothermal energy was looked into by the Dept of Energy in the 70s following the oil crisis. Twenty four countries around the world now have geothermal energy plants. Apparently ground and rick formations in Scotland and Cornwall look very promising.

Iceland does ok!
Female
wonderoushen  Female  Gwynedd 28-Aug-2019 10:56 Message #4749861
They could start by having the Swansea Tidal project go ahead, all the environmetal impact surveys and everything completed, all ready to go and the governments said no, would cost to much. Tides are regular and always will be unless someone nicks the moon, I'm sure there are lots of places around our coast and tidal rivers that could be used in this way.
Male
HotOrWot  Male  Lancashire 28-Aug-2019 16:52 Message #4749892
Geothermal energy was looked into by the Dept of Energy in the 70s following the oil crisis. Twenty four countries around the world now have geothermal energy plants. Apparently ground and rick formations in Scotland and Cornwall look very promising.

Iceland does ok!


Maybe Iceland should be with their supply of natural hot water could be showing others how it's done.
Male
tsunamiwarrior  Male  Hertfordshire 30-Aug-2019 21:59 Message #4750266
Nov. 2018. Drilling at the U.K.’s first deep geothermal electricity plant is to start this week. Located at the United Downs Industrial Estate in Cornwall, southwest England, the plant will provide enough energy to power 3,000 homes, according to Geothermal Engineering Ltd (GEL).

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/06/drilling-to-start-at-the-uks-first-deep-geothermal-electricity-plant.html
Female
RAACH84  Female  Buckinghamshire 6-Sep-2019 14:26 Message #4751164
How do opportunities with this compare to solar power, tidal power and wind power? How is the country doing?

Male
MrQuiet  Male  Northamptonshire 7-Sep-2019 07:22 Message #4751266
That is an excellent question Raach. I wish I had an excellent answer.
Male
A_man_called_CHIOG  Male  South East London 10-Sep-2019 08:05 Message #4751834
I’m still not much wiser about the viability of the different methods of providing power and which are likely to be the most useful in the future.


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