Conversation The Common Room
Helper icon Helpers: Chris2mates , LLstill , Magic Mike , PrincessFruitBat


About us


Midsummer's Eve is a free online dating community - based around friendship, real meetups, real people, and real relationships. We've been online since 1999 and have twice won Radio 2's Web Site of the Day award. So why not join us for free and join in the discussion?

Blue flowers and stuff!

1 2 Next >  Last >> 

Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 29-Jun-2013 15:10 Message #4375655
Well here I am, languishing in a typical country garden behind a quaint old cottage in a little hamlet in the 'eart of Ampshyre. There's a cool breeze caressing my skin as the sun turns it from white to pink to red. The barbie's on the go and the grub's being gently burnt to a cinder whilst my stomach rumbles in anticipation.

My ice-cold beer is sat on my sister's newly acquired garden table tempting me with the effervescence in the amber glow and just a few inches away form my right arm are some blue flowers cascading down an old brick wall and a small swarm of about 20 - 30 friendly bees humming away as they dart from flower to flower, carrying the fruits of their labours in the form of little gold blobs on their hind legs.

Oh what a surprise! Three aeroplanes have just flown over my sister's abode and, as far as I could make out, they looked like Hurricanes - it was hard to see as the sun was mainly in my eyes, but if they weren't Hurricanes they certainly looked to be of that ilk.

Anyway, back to the cascade of blue flowers - now seeing as though I can just about determine a buttercup from a daisy I thought I'd ask the good botanists of MSE if they had any idea what the flowers are. They look like small lavender blue starfish on green stems but some have 5 petals, some six, some seven, and some even have eight. Oh, and there's lots of small green leaves with them too!


I hope you are all having a good time too.


Cheers!


Jason.
Female
Blissful  Female  Essex 29-Jun-2013 15:33 Message #4375657
You paint such a lovely picture... feeling more than a little envious :)

I'm no expert but they sound like Campanula

:) x
Female
PollyValentiniusPoppy  Female  Worcestershire 29-Jun-2013 15:49 Message #4375664
OOOHHH!! What a tease you are Argo, painting such a vivid picture of your enviable surroundings (not to mention the ice-cold beer!). S'not fair, me's off to Tesco!

I'm not gonna hazard a guess as to what the delightful blooms are - perhaps you could paste a pic on your profile page dear?

Polly
X
Female
lucyjordan  Female  Tyne and Wear 29-Jun-2013 15:51 Message #4375665
i take it this plant is more trailing than bushy, something you would be likely to find in a rockery or border and short in height but with the propensity to spread?


Aubretia is a popular plant that is grown over walls and used to space fill.

also

Lithospermum diffusum, a small star shaped blue rockery plant with evergreen leaves.

or

geranium pratense a pale blue pereniiel of the geranium family,
Male
HopefulTim  Male  Hertfordshire 29-Jun-2013 15:53 Message #4375666
'Languishing' suggests you are not having a nice time but the beer suggests you are... and Polly, I hope you will be stocking up with onion bhajis and things for our natter at dusk.

{:-))
Female
lucyjordan  Female  Tyne and Wear 29-Jun-2013 15:59 Message #4375668
OOops Perennial, i dont know where my fingers went on that one.


Tim

Ive not checked a dictionary, but in my mind the word 'lanquishing' conjures up a very relaxed and comfortable position, not quite horizontal, but laid back enough to be able to nod off after a few bevies. Rightly or wrongly Ive never associated the word with anything other than having am enjoyable time.
Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 29-Jun-2013 18:29 Message #4375693
lj,

I think we had better congratulate TimVole esquire for his superlative lexical knowledge for, when I read his contribution, I went Post-haste to the nearest on-line dictionary to determine the true definition of the word 'languish' only to discover that he was indeed correct -- and I personally would like to offer him my gratitude for pointing out my erroneous use of the word for, like you, I too thought it meant just lolling around in a state of great relaxation - and have used it in that sense since time immemorial.

I can assure the good folks of MSE that it was in the sense that you outlined that was the state that I was in.




Jason.
Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 29-Jun-2013 18:33 Message #4375697
PollyanthusValentinititusPoppycorn,

I will probably do as you suggest and put a picture of the bloomin' things on my profile but first my sister wants to drag me down the road to a fête - or was that 'my fate'?





Jason.
Male
johnlock  Male  Essex 29-Jun-2013 20:03 Message #4375718
I thought that your sister dragged you down there to work on her house not wine, dine & entertain you, or is she just softening you up?

Regards
John
Male
HopefulTim  Male  Hertfordshire 29-Jun-2013 21:35 Message #4375740
Jason, a light beer (served lightly chilled in your garden) would be a thoroughly acceptable and very much appreciated expression of your gratitude...

...preferably without a demonstration of your skill in directing low-flying wellicopters around the burnt offerings.

{:-))
Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 29-Jun-2013 22:36 Message #4375778
Well, I've just returned from Sutton Scotney's answer to Glastonbury - a field full of beat, beer, and burgers!


I've uploaded a picture of the flowers in question - as per Pollywhatsit's advice - and you'll find it in my "MACROS" Gallery under the title of "Fleure-de-whatsits".



Thanks



Jason.
Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 29-Jun-2013 22:36 Message #4375779
TV,

If you're down Sutton Scotney way you'd be more than welcome to drop in for a cool beer.



Jason.
Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 29-Jun-2013 22:37 Message #4375780
You got it in one John L!


She's softening me up!





Jason.
Female
Soph  Female  East Anglia 29-Jun-2013 22:45 Message #4375784
I'd agree with Bliss, that they're campanula.
I suspected as much from the description.

Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 29-Jun-2013 22:56 Message #4375790
Thanks Soph!


And everyone else.





Jason.
Female
PollyValentiniusPoppy  Female  Worcestershire 29-Jun-2013 23:04 Message #4375802
What beaut blooms you have snapped Argo! Truly gorgeous.

I wouldn't beat yourself up re your use of the word 'languish'. It's a word I use frequently. I assumed you were referring to the fact that you weren't rushing about like the proverbial blue-butted fly ('failing to make progress'), as is your norm!

Glad you're having a great time!

PollyThingummyWhojamacallit
X
Female
PollyValentiniusPoppy  Female  Worcestershire 29-Jun-2013 23:07 Message #4375804
At this moment in time Timbo, PollyEatalotius is chomping on a GINORMOUS box of Jaffas!

NAH NAH NAH NAH NAAAHHH!!

Polly
X
Female
lucyjordan  Female  Tyne and Wear 29-Jun-2013 23:23 Message #4375809
Taken from wiki

Campanula /kæm'pæn.ju?l?/[2] is one of several genera in the family Campanulaceae with the common name bellflower. It takes its name from their bell-shaped flowers—campanula is Latin for "little bell".

Lithodora diffusa (purple gromwell), syn. Lithospermum diffusa, is a species of flowering plant in the family Boraginaceae. It is a mat-forming perennial growing to 15 cm (6 in) tall by 60 cm (24 in) or more wide, with dark green, hairy evergreen leaves and masses of brilliant blue 5-lobed flowers. It is suitable for cultivation in a rock garden or alpine garden.[1]

The Latin term lithodora literally means "stone gift", referring to its preferred habitat. *Diffusa8 means "spreading", and refers to the plant's growth habit.[4]

It is valued in gardens for its abundant flowers of intense azure blue.


Having compared your picture to the pictures of the above plants on wiki My money is on the Lithospermum diffusa



Checking your picture against wiki's pic of campanula, aubretia and lithospermum i would say that the lithospermum is the closest, but
Female
Minnie-the-Minx  Female  Hertfordshire 29-Jun-2013 23:42 Message #4375814
I always thought that languishing only applied to those in prison.
Male
HopefulTim  Male  Hertfordshire 29-Jun-2013 23:50 Message #4375818
So did I, your honour.
Female
lucyjordan  Female  Tyne and Wear 29-Jun-2013 23:59 Message #4375821
I too associated the word lanquishing with prison.

Only because many have said those inside have it easy, and its like a holiday camp for many of the inmates.

That doesnt paint a picture of what i imagine 'not having a good time' is all about, unless of course you have been to butlins and can do a comparison study
Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 30-Jun-2013 09:29 Message #4375899
lj,

Thanks for the research. I've had a look at the two offerings on Wikipedia and the flowers don't look anything like either of those two - these flowers literally look like mini blue starfish stuck on a stem and their petals are slender(ish) and smooth.


So the question's still open.




Jason.
Male
Argonaut  Male  Lancashire 30-Jun-2013 09:30 Message #4375900
Where's that PollyPropylene?

I'll rope her into making a botanical suggestion - after all, it was her suggestion that I put a piccie up!






Jason.
Female
PollyValentiniusPoppy  Female  Worcestershire 30-Jun-2013 10:52 Message #4375985
Good morning Argonautius

Here I is, not quite bright-eyed and bushy-tailed but there ya go!

I reckon the starfish plant could be a Sisyrinchium. I encountered some very unusual plants when I worked for a specialist nursery (as my garden would prove!) and that's the one that springs to mind.

Trust you're still relaxing (playing with your 'copter) and not yet up to yer ears in DIY!

PollyUrethanius
X
Male
HopefulTim  Male  Hertfordshire 30-Jun-2013 10:56 Message #4375989
Jason, you can forget about getting anything out of PollyPrettyFlowerLover - she has gone off in a huff because I rang her phone when she was stuffing herself with spicy rice... I have just received a red-hot message, telling to *never interrupt her again when she is busy with an Injun.

1 2 Next >  Last >> 


Back to top  Back to top

Help with conversations Help with conversations »